McCallie is an All-Boys Private Boarding School and Day School, a Christian-based College Prep School. 
McCallie seeks out and accepts boys from all ethnic, racial, religious, and socioeconomic backgrounds and places a high value on a diverse student body.

Science

Boys’ natural curiosity leads them to ask, “How does this work?” The passion for answers to that question begins with mixing chemicals for a plaster of paris volcano and catching frogs, but it moves over time toward periodic tables and dissection. Today’s globally interdependent, scientifically-driven world requires a level of scientific literacy significantly more advanced than periodic tables and dissection, however. From atmospheric warming challenges to newly-discovered, genetically-based medical advances, the increasingly complex issues demand the study of not only the scientific facts and processes of each discrete area of biology, chemistry, and physics, but also of the connections to real life applications and scenarios.
 
Once boys have the necessary foundations in scientific vocabulary, questioning, research, and analysis, they engage in using these skills to address questions at the heart of today’s world dilemmas, such as: How do we develop low-cost, highly effective drugs to combat the social destruction caused by AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa? What are the possible ecosystem harms from the move to genetically modified corn and soybeans in the nation’s food supply?
 
Real world relevance of the material, authentic application of data and skills, and active engagement are all cornerstones of each science course. Though the exact progression through the courses may be different for each student, the end goal is the same: to not only understand and function in today’s world but to be motivated to engage and improve it.

Courses

Science 110 - Introduction to Scientific Thinking & Research

Course Title:
SCI110 Introduction to Scientific Thinking & Research

Course Description: 
Introduction to Scientific Thinking is a ninth or tenth grade level science course integrating science topics while stressing the ways in which scientists seek to understand the natural world. This course seeks to expose students to some of the fundamental principles of science in both a conceptual and quantitative fashion, primarily through the application of authentic design challenges. Topics of study will be drawn from the core laboratory sciences: biology, physics and chemistry. The topics are explored through project based learning, group activities, demonstrations, problem solving, writing assignments, design challenges and laboratory experiences.  Grade: 9-10

Academic Goals:
  1. Students will explore major physical and biological principals of the natural world through a variety of sources. 
  2. Students will engage themselves in scientific thinking, utilizing a broad repertoire of reasoning to understand actual physical phenomena.
  3. Students will cultivate effective communication of their ideas through a host writing and speaking activities.
  4. Students will explore how science occurs in their everyday lives.
  5. By reporting on recent discoveries in science, students will understand the dynamic nature of science.
  6. Students will utilize technology as appropriate tools for teaching and learning.
  7. The development of problem solving skills, engineering design and the recognition of patterns will be a major emphasis for students of the course.

Instructional Methods:

  1. By employing "problem based learning" scenarios, students will explore actual scientific situations and construct understanding of concepts and relationships.
  2. The use writing to learn assignments will be used throughout the course.
  3. Students will be assigned research topics in small groups and asked to present their expertise to the class.
  4. Students will offer peer evaluations of written and oral presentations.
  5. Students will explore, when appropriate, the intersection of science and public policy.
  6. Students will conduct, when appropriate, a semester long research project demonstrating how a field of science impacts our present day existence.
  7. Many in-depth projects will focus on the viewing of science-based programming (NOVA, Scientific American, etc.).
  8. Writing Benchmark: Students will write lab reports, using data and calculations to form conclusions, based on a format standardized for scientific publication. A report may include the following sections: questions of interest, hypothesis, materials, procedure, data, data analysis, conclusions, and discussion of sources of error.

Evaluation:

  1. The use of multiple writing assignments will be used throughout the course. These may include:
    1. Essay tests prompting students to explain and apply physics concepts to novel situations.
    2. Writing to learn activities in which students explore topics of their choice and share their expertise in various ways (synopsis of a recent discovery in science, position paper on the implications of a scientific idea to modern society, etc.).
    3. Formal scientific writing in which students communicate a detailed description of laboratory exercises and interpret their findings.
    4. Use of digital portfolios to track student growth over time.
  2. The use of formative assessment tools such as portfolios, questionnaires, and self-evaluations.
  3. Oral interviews whereby students respond to questions and use scientific apparatus to demonstrate understanding.
  4. In-class tests using a host of evaluation methods: problem solving, short essays, multiple choice, etc.
  5. Open-ended projects allowing students to incorporate visual, written artistic, and conceptual issues as a means to understand physics.
  6. Exam projects: In addition to more traditional methods of evaluations, students will complete a "lab" component of their exam where appropriate. Topics will require students to synthesize their understanding to demonstrate understanding.

Science 120 - Intro to Physics

Course Title:
SCI120 Introduction to Physics

Course Description:
Introduction to Physics is the first physical science course taken by students who have demonstrated a strong quantitative aptitude. This course seeks to expose students to some of the fundamental principles of physics in both a conceptual and quantitative fashion. Topics of study include waves, sound, light, electricity and magnetism,and mechanics. The topics are explored through classroom lectures, group activities, demonstrations, problem solving, writing assignments and laboratory experiences. Grade: 9-11

 

 

Academic Goals:
  1. Students will explore major physical principals of the natural world through a variety of sources.
  2. Students will engage themselves in scientific thinking, utilizing deductive and inductive reasoning to understand actual physical phenomena.
  3. Students will cultivate effective communication of their ideas through a host writing and speaking activities.
  4. Students will explore how physics occurs in their everyday lives.
  5. By reporting on recent discoveries in science, students will understand the dynamic nature of sscience.
  6. Students will utilize technology as appropriate tools for teaching and learning.
  7. The development of problem solving skills and the recognition of patterns will be a major emphasis for students of physics.
Instructional Methods:
  1. By employing "problem based learning" scenarios, students will explore actual physical situations and construct understanding of concepts and relationships.
  2. The use of "free writes" to initially explore topics and other writing to learn devices will be used.
  3. Students will be assigned research topics in small groups and asked to present their expertise to the class.
  4. Students will offer peer evaluations of written and oral presentations.
  5. Students will explore, when appropriate, the intersection of science and public policy.
  6. Students will conduct, when appropriate, a semester long research project demonstrating how a field of science impacts our present day existence.
  7. Many in-depth projects will focus on the viewing of science-based programming (NOVA, Scientific American, etc.).
  8. Writing Benchmark: Students will write lab reports, using data and calculations to form conclusions, based on a format standardized for scientific publication. A report may include the following sections: questions of interest, hypothesis, materials, procedure, data, data analysis, conclusions, and discussion of sources of error.
Evaluation:
  1. The use of multiple writing assignments will be used throughout the course. These may include:
    1. Essay tests prompting students to explain and apply physics concepts to novel situations.
    2. Writing to learn activities in which students explore topics of their choice and share their expertise in various ways (synopsis of a recent discovery in science, position paper on the implications of a scientific idea to modern society, etc.).
    3. Formal scientific writing in which students communicate a detailed description of laboratory exercises and interpret their findings.
    4. Use of portfolios to track student growth over time.
  2. The use of formative assessment tools such as portfolios, questionnaires, and self-evaluations.
  3. Oral interviews whereby students respond to questions and use scientific apparatus to demonstrate understanding.
  4. In-class tests using a host of evaluation methods: problem solving, short essays, multiple choice, etc.
  5. Open-ended projects allowing students to incorporate visual, written artistic, and conceptual issues as a means to understand physics.
  6. Exam projects: In addition to more traditional methods of evaluations, students will complete a "lab" component of their exam where appropriate. Topics will require students to synthesize their understanding to demonstrate understanding.

Science 210 - General Biology

Course Title:
SCI210 General Biology

Course Description:
The goals of this course are to develop an understanding and appreciation for the diversity of life and to develop an understanding and appreciation of the interrelationships existing within this diversity.  From this background, students further their appreciation of the impact of human activity on biological systems and man's place in nature. This course places a heavy emphasis on students “constructing a framework” of biology concepts through a variety of classroom activities such as laboratory investigations, class discussions, writing assignments, and special projects. Grade: 9-11
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Woven through the course are unifying fundamental biological conpepts that form a framework for teaching the goals of general Biology.  Students develop an understanding and appreciation of:
    1. The nature of scientific inquiry: Science is a dynamic open-ended endeavor; it allows students some insight into the world of biologists by performing laboratory investigations and research which reflect the experimental approach of scientific enterprise.
    2. The levels of biological organization -- from molecular to cell, including system, organisms, population, communities, ecosystems, and biosphere. 
    3. The diversity of life and the interrelations and interdependence existing between organisms.
    4. The biological roots of problems in medicine, public health, agriculture, and conservation.
    5. The historical development of biological concepts and the relationship of these concepts to society and technology.
    6. The requirements of all living organisms for energy and molecular building blocks to grow, reproduce, and maintain homeostasis.
    7. The molecular basis of heredity and protein synthesis and the process of evolution that drives the diversity of life.
    8. The place of humans in nature: As living creatures, we have much in common with other organisms. We intereact with all organisms in the biological systems of the earth. Knowledge of the human impact on these systems is critical.

Instructional Methods:

  1. Students will analyze biological issues and evidence, relating them to the basic themes of the course.
  2. Students will form and use models to simplify complex biological situations for easier understanding.
  3. Students will present and interpret their research, observations and conclusions through the use of presentations, descriptive text, drawings, and scientific tables and graphs.
  4. Students will master specific laboratory procedural technology and equipment skills.
  5. Students will build vocabulary knowledge and be able to determine a strategy for finding content and contextual meaning for unknown words.
  6. Students will identify and investigate problems scientifically, and will examine hypotheses, variables, and results in an experiment.  Students will distinguish data from opinion. 
  7. Students will recognize patterns, compare structure and function, analyze data, and infer conclusions in a laboratory setting.

Evaluation:

  1. Students will demonstrate understanding by orally answering questions and discussing topics posed by the teacher or by other students.
  2. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the reading texts through successful completion of daily homework assignments.
  3. Students will have opportunities to demonstrate mastery of biological concepts on tests and quizzes.
  4. Students will demonstrate competency by defending interpretations of data collected in laboratory exercises and published data.
  5. Students will demonstrate on the semester exam comprehensive understanding of biological concepts.  The exam will consist of two parts: multiple choice questions that require the students to use the knowledge he has gained throughout the semester, and a laboratory portion which summarizes and integrates the concepts he has learned.
  6. Students are required to maintain an organized notebook.
  7. Students will effectively communicate through article reviews, online webquests, laboratory reports, speaking assignments, and scientific research papers.  By reporting on recent discoveries in biology, students will understand the dynamic and pervasive nature of biology.

Science 220 - Honors Biology

ourse Title:
SCI220 Honors Biology

Course Description:
Honors Biology is a course that emphasizes the practice of science as a "way of knowing." Concepts are reinforced experientially in the laboratory. Using a variety of research technologies, including advanced calculator-based sampling techniques and computer analysis, microscopic observation, and an individual research project, students carefully describe the interaction between variables and pose hypotheses to explain their observations. The content of Honors Biology is an elaboration of a number of essential themes or "Big Ideas." These encompass the methodology of science, unity and diversity in biological systems, how these systems collect and utilize the energy and matter they require, and how these systems change and adapt over time. Class format is varied but includes a stimulating mixture of lecture, discussion and hands-on inquiry. Honors biology encourages a student's depth of understanding such that he can apply the concepts he learns to new situations and his daily life. Teaching strategies such as interpretation and analysis of experimental results, making predictions, identifying assumptions, and applying concepts to solve new problems are used to develop critical thinking skills. Biology's relationship to other academic disciplines will be explored in writing assignments. Students completing the course will develop an appreciation for how biology affects their daily lives. Grade: 9-12
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students consistently will be exposed to the idea that in biological systems every action, however minute, has some effect on other parts of the system and that large systems are complexes of smaller systems.
  2. Students will be exposed to the idea that combinations of structural and functional features lead to special or emergent properties (synergism), more than a mere sum of the parts can account for.
  3. Students will be exposed to the idea that the structure and function of biological systems is logical and has many analogies to human constructs.
  4. Students will be exposed to the idea that science is a strict method used to understand the universe and, consequently, is limited by this method.
  5. Students will demonstrate the ability to establish objectives and develop strategies aimed at their fulfillment.
  6. Students will demonstrate the ability to cooperate with students and faculty in the learning process.
  7. Students will demonstrate the ability to select their own topic for study and conduct ongoing research in this area.
  8. Students will develop the ability to ask questions and generate hypotheses which will direct their studies.
  9. Students will develop the ability to measure and tolerate variation in biological systems and understand the importance of variation to the process of adaptation.
  10. Students will develop academic independence and a willingness to share ideaas.
  11. Students will develop the ability to compile, organize, retain, and apply information.
  12. Students will develop the ability to think critically and to examine the biological world from a variety of perspectives.
  13. Students will develop the ability to learn by listening to others and to write and speak clearly.
  14. Students will develop the ability to collect, generalize from, and analyze observations.
  15. Students will develop the ability to learn efficiently by managing their time and resources.
  16. Students will develop the discipline of periodically reviewing course material in order to encourage long-term learning.
  17. Students will further develop the ability to respect others and to accept personal responsibility for their actions.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will learn through a combination of class discussion, active listening, lecture, and a variety of hands-on experiences.
  2. Students will be encouraged through creative assignments to go beyond the confines of their textbooks and traditional points of view.
  3. Students will be given experience in the method of science, hypothesis construction, the design of controlled tests, the measurement and organization of results, and result interpretation.
  4. Students will be given short- and long-term assignments with both fixed and open-ended outcomes.
  5. Students will be given assignments and evaluations which challenge them to acquire, retain, and apply information to meeting their objectives.
  6. Writing Benchmark: Students will write lab reports, using data and calculations to form conclusions, based on a format standardized for scientific publication. A report may include the following sections: questions of interest, hypothesis, materials, procedure, data, data analysis, conclusions, and discussion of sources of error.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will be given quizzes to periodically evaluate their understanding.
  2. Students will be given tests requiring the retention of larger quantities of information in order to evaluate their command for the subject and their ability to express themselves clearly and concisely.
  3. Students will be required to complete a project as a practical evaluation of their ability to do science.
  4. The first semester exam is content based, evaluating the comprehensive understanding of the material covered during the first semester. Questions will range from simple recall, to data analysis, to lengthy essays on the "Big Ideas" in Biology. The second semester exam also will emphasize the "Big Ideas". Both semesters will include a scientific study planned and carried out by the student. The students are evaluated on their ability to be scientists, including their ability to research a question, pose hypotheses, and test these hypotheses in a scientifically valid manner.

Science 230 - AP Biology

Course Title:
SCI230 AP Biology

Course Description:
Advanced Placement Biology is part of a nationwide program based on the belief that many students are ready for college work while still in high school, and their abilities should be recognized, encouraged and rewarded. As a college level course, the amount of material covered as well as the complexity of the topics will be high. It is the responsibility of the student to come to class each day understanding the previous day's material. An ongoing unstated assignment, therefore, is to learn the material as it is presented. Students must be certain that they are willing to accept this challenge and be committed to keep up with the work.

 
AP Biology is structured around four Big ideas described in the Curriculum Framework, which encompass the core scientific principles, theories, and processes governing living organisms and biological systems. At least one of the Big ideas will be incorporated in every lesson throughout the course.
 
The four Big ideas are:
 
Big idea 1: The process of evolution drives the diversity and unity of life.
Big idea 2: Biological systems utilize free energy and molecular building blocks to grow, to reproduce and to maintain dynamic homeostasis.
Big idea 3: Living systems store, retrieve, transmit and respond to information essential to life processes.
Big idea 4: Biological systems interact, and these systems and their interactions possess complex properties.
 
Class discussions may be based on animations from various sources (textbook, CDs, Internet, etc.) to help the students visualize what they have read. “Clicker” style quizzes are interspersed throughout the unit and inform how instruction may need to be adjusted to improve student learning. Lectures may be provided online in some cases, units may be “flipped” so that more class time can be devoted to laboratory and discussion.
 
The two main goals of AP Biology are to help students develop a conceptual framework for modern biology and to help students gain an appreciation of science as a process. The ongoing information explosion in biology makes these goals even more challenging. Students are encouraged to focus on understanding important relationships, processes, mechanisms, and potential extensions and applications of concepts. 

The course provides opportunities to connect scientific knowledge to major social issues to help students become scientifically literate citizens.


Prerequisite: Honors Chemistry or Honors Biology. Grade: 10-12

Science 240 - Introduction to Molecular Biology

Course Title:
SCI240 Introduction to Molecular Biology

Course Description: 
The focus of this course will be to teach students common molecular biological research methodologies and laboratory techniques.  The course will be a one-year long biology elective.  The primary goal is to build molecular biology skills in high school students through hands-on laboratory activities that have real-world applications.  After becoming proficient in basic skills during the first semester, students will be able to conduct their own mini-research project in optimization of lab techniques, agricultural and animal research projects, or human and health research projects during the last quarter.
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Introduce students to the biotechnology arena including academic, industrial, governmental research through hands-on research activities and reading the primary literature.
  2. Improve scientific reading skills by conducting primary literature searches, including the Science Journal.  There will be projects on current research papers including presentations and discussions of current high-impact research.
  3. Train students early on to acquire competency in basic laboratory skills such as pipeting, solution making, lab safety, keeping a lab notebook, operating equipment, and working with bacteria using aseptic technique.  Such lab skills will prepare students for working as undergraduate research assistants.
  4. Build academic confidence in molecular biology through learning background information on current biotechnology concepts and methods and then enhance this knowledge through hands-on laboratory activities of the techniques.  Labs will be performed using step by step protocols in microbiological (bacteriological) techniques, manipulating DNA (recombinant DNA/cloning, polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA), protein analysis (quantitation, chromatography, and SDS-PAGE), and immuniological assays.
  5. Introduce students to cell lines used in biomedical research, such as stem cells and primary cells.  (If able to purchase a biological safety cabinet and cell incubator, we would also be able to perform cell culture experiments in the course.)
  6. Encourage teamwork through collaborations with their classmates and other cancer research scientists.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Reading background information of concepts in the textbook
  2. Reading and performing lab protocols in textbook
  3. Class discussions on research papers and textbook material
  4. Focused research project in last quarter
Evaluation:
  1. Projects on published research papers
  2. Multiple choice and short answer tests
  3. Laboratory notebook
  4. Research project presentations and papers

Science 250 - Marine and Freshwater Biology

Course Title:
SCI250 Marine and Freshwater Biology

Course Description:
Over a semester, students will explore the science of marine and freshwater biology, from the organismal level of life cycles and role in food webs to the ecosystem level of nutrient cycling and physical geography.  Significant attention will be focused on human interactions and ecological impacts, from fishing to ground water use to wetland preservation.  Students will gain direct experience with marine research through experiments with jellyfish and field experience in nearby streams.  Extensive exchange with the Tennessee Aquarium will further enhance the experience.  Grade: 11-12

Science 310 - General Chemistry

Course Title:
SCI310 General Chemistry

Course Description:
General Chemistry develops the thinking skills required to integrate basic chemical concepts with analytical application. Laboratory experiences and research projects are woven into the lectures and demonstrations so that students can see connections between the material and the real world. Students completing the course should have an appreciation for how chemistry affects their daily lives and are prepared for freshman college chemistry. Co-requisite: Algebra 2, Precalculus, Calculus or Topics in Applied Math. Grade: 11-12
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Describe and predict reactions with chemical symbols and equations.
  2. Be able to interpret the relationships of chemical formulas and equations.
  3. Be able to apply problem-solving techniques.
  4. Understand the structure of the atom and how it affects reactivity.
  5. Be able to classify matter and its phases.
  6. Appreciate the historical development of chemistry.
  7. Develop an awareness of the role of chemistry in everyday life.
  8. Be alerted to chemical and environmental hazards.
  9. Develop laboratory techniques to prove the laws of chemistry and analyze chemicals.
  10. Understand the factors that affect reaction rates and spontaneity.
  11. Develop an understanding of the properties of solutions and solution chemistry.
  12. Use the scientific method in laboratory exercises and problem solving.
  13. Use technology and reference materials to research chemical information for laboratory investigations and projects.
  14. Learn to use the calculator effectively for problem solving and for the collection and analysis of data.
  15. Be able to prepare and interpret graphs to demonstrate relationships in data.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Perform laboratory experiments to collect and interpret data.
  2. Take lecture notes and read the text to acquire fundamental information.
  3. Collaborate to solve problems.
  4. Complete open-ended projects to solve "real world" chemical problems.
  5. Perform, observe, and explain chemical demonstrations.
  6. Practice modeled problem-solving techniques.
  7. Use rubrics as a learning guide for mastery of selected assignments.
  8. Write lab reports, using data and calculations to form conclusions, based on a narrative format. A report may include the following sections: questions of interest, hypothesis, materials, procedure, data, data analysis, conclusions, and discussion of sources of error.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate understanding by orally answering questions posed in class, by presenting results of research projects to the class and by solving example problems in class.
  2. Students will demonstrate understanding through successful completion of daily homework assignments.
  3. Students will demonstrate, as evaluated by course rubrics,oral and written comprehension of material as well as analysis of information gathered from research.
  4. Students will demonstrate on tests and quizzes mastery and application of concepts.
  5. Students will demonstrate safety and competency in the laboratory by successfully completing laboratory exercises.
  6. Students will demonstrate on the semester exams comprehensive understanding of chemical concepts and their applications. The Fall exam will be the traditional exam with multiple choice and problem solving questions.  The Spring exam will consist of the National Test for High School Chemistry

Science 320 - Honors Chemistry

Course Title:
SCI320 Honors Chemistry

Course Description:
Designed to give the student a sound foundation in basic chemical principles and a competence in dealing with chemical problems, Honors Chemistry is principally in lecture format, using demonstrations and problem solving to reinforce the academic material. The theoretical models studied in the classroom are verified by laboratory experimentation. The course stresses clear thinking, as well as a problem solving approach applied to chemical theories. Co-requisite: (9-10) Geometry Honors or Algebra 2 & Trigonometry Honors, (11-12) Pre-Calculus Accelerated or above. Grade: 9-12
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will properly use chemical symbols and nomenclature.
  2. Students will be able to interpret the relationships given by chemical formulas and equations.
  3. Students will predict products of chemical reactions.
  4. Students will be able to apply chemical problem-solving techniques.
  5. Students will appreciate the structure of the atom and understand how the structure affects reactivity.
  6. Students will be able to use the atomic theory and the kinetic theory to explain the properties of matter.
  7. Students will use the VSEPR model and the concept of hybridization to predict the molecular structure and properties of a compound.
  8. Students will learn to differentiate the characteristics of the four types of crystals.
  9. Students will have an understanding of thermochemistry and will describe how heat flows in an ordinary chemical reaction.
  10. Students will appreciate the historical development of chemistry.
  11. Students will develop an awareness of the role of chemistry in their lives.
  12. Students will be alerted to chemical and environmental hazards.
  13. Students will develop laboratory techniques to demonstrate the laws of chemistry and analyze chemicals.
  14. Students will properly analyze and report laboratory data.
  15. Students will understand the factors that affect reaction rates and spontaneity.
  16. Students will develop an understanding of the qualitative and quantitative aspects of solution chemistry.
  17. Students will describe and use concepts of chemical equilibrium.
  18. Students will use technology and reference materials to research chemical information.
  19. Students will learn to use the calculator effectively for problem solving and collection and analysis of data.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will perform laboratory experiments to collect and interpret data.
  2. Students will take lecture notes and read the text to acquire fundamental information.
  3. Students will collaborate to solve problems.
  4. Students will complete open-ended projects to solve chemical problems.
  5. Students will observe and explain chemical demonstrations.
  6. Students will practice problem-solving techniques which are modeled by the teacher.
  7. Students will attend one-on-one help sessions.
  8. Writing Benchmark: Students will write lab reports, using data and calculations to form conclusions, based on a standard format. A report may include the following sections: questions of interest, hypothesis, materials, procedure, data, data analysis, conclusions, and discussion of sources of error.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate understanding by orally answering questions posed by the teacher and by solving example problems in class.
  2. Students will demonstrate understanding through successful completion of homework assignments.
  3. Students will demonstrate comprehension and analysis of information gathered from research.
  4. Students will demonstrate mastery of concepts using tests and quizzes.
  5. Students will use proper techniques, as evaluated by a rubric, to determine the ions present in a water solution.
  6. Students will demonstrate competency by successfully completing laboratory exercises.
  7. Students will keep a well-organized and accurate laboratory notebook which will be evaluated by use of a rubric.
  8. Students will demonstrate on the semester exams their comprehensive understanding of chemical concepts. In the fall semester, the exam will consist of two sections: a multiple choice section worth and a free-response problem section.  The spring semester exam will consist of the national Test of High School Chemistry, a multiple choice exam, and will be cumulative over the entire year.

Science 330 - AP Chemistry

Course Title:
SCI330 AP Chemistry

Course Description:
Advanced Chemistry stresses chemical calculations, scientific writing and the mathematical formulation of chemical principles. Topics are similar to those in Honors Chemistry but are pursued at considerably greater depth. Longer and more challenging experimentation verifies the academic material covered in the classroom. Classes are principally lectures, in conjunction with demonstrations, scientific writing, and problem solving. Prerequisite: Honors Chemistry. Grade: 10-12
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will master the following concepts:
    1. Solids, liquids, and changes of phase
    2. Stoichiometry
    3. Solutions
    4. Redox
    5. Acids and bases
    6. Thermochemistry
    7. Kinetics
    8. Atomic theory and structure
    9. Equilibrium
    10. Chemical bonds
    11. Thermodynamics
    12. Gases (individual gas laws lead to the general gas laws)
    13. Electochemistry
  2. Students will demonstrate the ability to:
    1. Solve analytical problems
    2. Manipulate numerical and other data
    3. Use information to identify patterns, report trends and draw inferences
    4. Make predictions and hypotheses
  3. In laboratory work, students will demonstrate skills necessary to use ordinary (beakers, crucibles burners, etc.) and measuring (balance, graduated cylinders, etc.) equipment in the lab.
  4. Students will demonstrate familiarity with general types of processes and procedures in chemical laboratory work:
    1. Synthesis of compounds
    2. Separations (precipitation and filtration, dehydration, centrifugation)
    3. Observing and recording phase changes
    4. Titration using indicators and pH probe
    5. Colorimetry
    6. Devising and utilizing a scheme for qualitative analysis of ions in solution
    7. Gravimetric analysis
  5. In laboratory work, students will demonstrate the ability to make observations and manipulate data:
    1. Accurate recording of careful observations
    2. How to make and interpret quantitative measurements correctly
    3. How to evaluate their own data, to do their own calculations, and to ponder over their own errors.
  6. Students will develop the following attitudes:
    1. Concern for accuracy and precision
    2. Objectivity
    3. Integrity
    4. Inventiveness
  7. Students will be able to develop laboratory techniques to demonstrate the laws of chemistry and analyze chemicals.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will work in pairs collecting data, recording data, and making observations in the laboratory.
  2. Students will work individually collecting data, recording data, and making observations in the laboratory.
  3. Students will take good notes and read the textbook to supplement the classroom lecture.
  4. Students will participate in classroom discussions relating to the material being presented in class.
  5. Students will develop procedures for open-ended experiments.
  6. Students will work analytical problems in the classroom. This process will be done individually and in small groups.
  7. Students will work qualitative examples in the classroom. This process will be done individually and in small groups.
  8. Writing Benchmark: Students will write lab reports, using data and calculations to form conclusions, based on a standard format. A report may include the following sections: questions of interest, hypothesis, materials, procedure, data, data analysis, conclusions, and discussion of sources of error.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will perform the necessary calculations and arrive at a conclusion after analyzing the data from lab.
  2. Students will keep a well organized and accurate laboratory notebook.
  3. Students will be graded on their quantitative results for some experiments.
  4. Students will be graded on their procedures they develop for open-ended experiments.
  5. Students will be graded on certain homework assignments.
  6. Students will demonstrate their comprehension of the subject material by completing period long tests.
  7. Students will sucessfully complete the Advanced Placement Chemistry exam.
  8. The fall semester exam is a 180-minute examination, divided into two parts. The first part (90 minutes) constitutes 45% of the exam grade and consists of 70 multiple-choice questions. The second part (90 minutes) of the examination constitutes 55% of the exam grade and contains essays and problem solving questions. Students will take the AP examination in lieu of the spring semester examination.

Science 410 - General Physics

Course Title:
SCI410 General Physics

Course Description:
The course is designed to provide the student with a strong understanding of the principles of physics and how they affect everyday life. The class will explore the topics of classical mechanics, including vector math, constant acceleration, Newton's Laws, collisions, energy and projectile motion. In addition, the subjects of rotational motion, wave phenomena, oscillatory motion, electromagnetism and modern physics will be discussed. The class combines lectures, problem solving, and laboratory work to provide the best comprehension possible. Co-requisite: Pre-Calculus Accelerated or Pre-Calculus Honors or above. Grade: 12

Academic Goals:
  1. Students will demonstrate their understanding of how systems of objects obey the same physical laws as do individiual objects.
  2. Students will demonstrate that they understand how to break more complex systems down into their fundamental parts to observe the relationship between the whole system and its parts.
  3. Students will show their comprehension of the differences between technical writing and essay writing. In addition, they will show their ability to gain information through reading technical material.
  4. Students will recognize the influence that one object in a system may have on the other objects in that system.
  5. Students will demonstrate a strong understanding of how to approach and solve various types of word problems.
  6. Students will show the ability to work together collaboratively on laboratory exercises and on problem-solving exercises.
  7. Students will demonstrate persistence in working through more difficult and/or lengthy assignments.
  8. Students will show an awareness that there are often multiple possible answers to a given question, none of which is necessarily "the right answer," and all of which have merit.
  9. Students will demonstrate the ability to write a formal laboratory report, in which they show their comprehension of what physically took place in the laboratory and what conclusions can be drawn from their results.
  10. Students will show their ability to use technical devices like computers, probles, sensors, and calculators to take and evaluate data.
  11. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the content material covered during the year, which includes statics, kinematics, energy, vector math, rotational motion, momentum, oscillatory motion, electricity, wave phenomena, optics, and modern physics.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will participate in group laboratory exercises in which they will both take data and discuss what it is they are observing.
  2. Students will work in small groups to solve sets of word problems in which they will take a larger problem and break it down into its component parts.Students will show their understanding of class material by answering questions posed by the teacher or by other students
  3. Students will participate in class discussions analyzing what is happening in a given situation and how it relates to previously learned information.
  4. Students will work independently to solve problems and demonstrate their comprehension of how to apply what they have previously learned to a different situation.
  5. Students will take lecture notes and read the text to acquire fundamental information.
  6. Writing Benchmark: Students will write lab reports, using data and calculations to form conclusions, based on a format standardized for scientific publication. A report may include the following sections: questions of interest, hypothesis, materials, procedure, data, data analysis, conclusions, and discussion of sources of error.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will show their understanding of what is being discussed every day in class through answering questions posed by the teacher or by other students.
  2. Students will demonstrate their comprehension through homework assignments, which are given on a daily basis. Some of the assignments will be reading sections from their textbook; the students will show their comprehension of what they have read on reading quizzes. Other assignments will be problems similar to those covered in class the previous day; the students will show an understanding of how to work that particular type of problem on the daily problem assignments.
  3. Students will demonstrate both their powers of observation and their abilities in technical writing on formal laboratory reports in which they will write sections describing what the laboratory was about and what they observed during its execution. They will also analyze data mathematically on the laboratory reports.
  4. Students will demonstrate their overall comprehension on the semester examination, on which they will answer questions and solve problems covering the full range of the material they have learned during the semester. Some of the questions will be a factual nature, but most of them will require the students to put what they have learned into practice.

 

 

Science 420 - Honors Physics

Course Title:
SCI420 Honors Physics

Course Description: 
The year-long Honors Physics course is offered to seniors and select juniors who have proven themselves to be strong in physical science and mathematics. Honors Physics provides the student with the curriculum of an introductory non-calculus-based college level physics course such as pre-med students would take in college. Major topics covered in the course include kinematics, dynamics, statics, rotational motion, waves, optics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. The class consists of a combination of lecture, discussion, problem solving, and formal labs. Corequisite: Calculus AB or Calculus BC.  Grade: 11-12

Academic Goals:
  1. Students will demonstrate their understanding of how systems of objects obey the same physical laws as do individual objects.
  2. Students will demonstrate that they understand how to break more complex systems down into their fundamental parts to observe the relationship between the whole system and its parts.
  3. Students will show their comprehension of the differences between technical writing and essay writing. In adddition, they will show their ability to gain information through reading technical material.
  4. Students will recognize the influence that one object in a system may have on the other objects in that system.
  5. Students will demonstrate a strong understanding of how to approach and solve various types of word problems.
  6. Students will show the ability to work together collaboratively on laboratory exercises and on problem-solving exercises.
  7. Students will demonstrate persistence in working through more difficult and/or lengthy assignments.
  8. Students will show an awareness that there are often multiple possible answers to a given question, none of which is necessarily "the right answer," and all of which have merit.
  9. Students will demonstrate the ability to write a formal laboratory report, in which they show their comprehension of what physically took place in the laboratory and what conclusions can be drawn from their results.
  10. Students will show their abilitiy to use technical devices like computers, probes, sensors, and calculators to take and evaluate data.
  11. Students will demonstrate a knowledge of how to approach tests under time constraints.
  12. Students will show their ability to answer technically-based multiple choice questions.
  13. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of thermodynamics, magnetism, and nuclear physics in addition to those topics covered in general physics.
  14. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the content material covered during the year, which includes statics, kinematics, energy, vector math, rotational motion, momentum, oscillatory motion, electricity, wave phenomena, optics, and modern physics.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will participate in group laboratory exercises, in which they will both take data and discuss what it is they are observing.
  2. Students will work in small groups to solve sets of word problems, in which they will take a larger problem and break it down into its component parts.
  3. Students will participate in class discussions analyzing what is happening in a given situation and how it relates to previously learned information.
  4. Students will work independently to solve problems and demonstrate their comprehension of how to apply what they have previously learned to a different situation.
  5. Students will take lecture notes and read the text to acquire fundamental information. Students will work through practice multiple choice question sets throughout the year.
  6. Students will review the course material and work through old AP exam questions for the last several weeks prior to the AP examination.
  7. Writing Benchmark: Students will write lab reports, using data and calculations to form conclusions, based on a format standardized for scientific publication. A report may include the following sections: questions of interest, hypothesis, materials, procedure, data, data analysis, conclusions, and discussion of sources of error.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will show their understanding of what is being discussed every day in class through answering questions posed by the teacher or by other students.
  2. Students will demonstrate their comprehension of the material being covered on chapter tests, on which they will be asked to solve problems utilizing the information in that chapter and to show knowledge of the vocabulary associated with that chapter. They will also be asked to make connections between the most recent material and prior material on chapter tests.
  3. Students will demonstrate their comprehension through homework assignments, which are given on a daily basis. Some of the assignments will be reading sections from their textbook; the students will show their comprehension of what they have read on reading quizzes. Other assignments will be problems similar to those covered in class the previous day; the students will show an understanding of how to work that particular type of problem on the daily problem assignments.
  4. Students will demonstrate both their powers of observation and their abilities in technical writing on formal laboratory reports, in which they will write sections describing what the laboratory was about and what they observed during its execution. They will also analyze data mathematically on the laboratory reports.
  5. Students will demonstrate their overall comprehension on the semester examination, on which they will answer questions and solve problems covering the full range of material they have learned during the semester. Some of the questions will be of a factual nature, but most of them will require the students to put what they have learned into practice.
  6. Students will take the AP examination in lieu of the second semester examination.

Science 450 - AP Physics C

Course Title:
SCI450 AP Physics C

Course Description:
Advanced Physics C is designed to serve as the foundation in physics for students who plan to major in the sciences or engineering in college. The first semester is devoted to a study of Newtonian Mechanics, while the second semester focuses on electricity and magnetism.  A year-long Mechanics option is also offered. Methods of calculus are used whenever appropriate in formulating physical principles and applying them to problems. Co-requisite: Calculus BC. Grade: 11-12

Academic Goals:
  1. Students will demonstrate a conceptual understanding of kinematics and the laws of motion.
  2. Students will analyze systems of particles and apply principles of static and dynamic equilibrium to predict and explain the motion of an object.
  3. Students will understand the relationship between work and energy and apply Conservation of Energy in order to solve problems.
  4. Students will use conservation of momentum to analyze collisions of particles in one and two dimensions.
  5. Students will expand their understanding of motion to include rotational motion and angular momentum.
  6. Students will describe periodic motion and simple harmonic motion.
  7. Students will use the law of universal gravitation and Kepler's laws to describe the motion of planets and satellites.
  8. Students will explain and use the concepts of electrostatics.
  9. Students will describe the role of devices such as capacitors, resistors, and inductors in electrical circuits and will perform calculations involving these devices.
  10. Students will explain and use the concepts of magnetostatics.
  11. Students will understand the concepts of electromagnetism and will describe the connections between electric fields and magnetic fields.
  12. Students will explain the implications of Maxwell's equations.
  13. Students will develop problem-solving techniques that apply to physics problems.
  14. Students will learn to manipulate vector quantities and to predict directions of vectors.
  15. Students will use techniques of calculus to derive equations and solve problems.
  16. Students will construct and use conceptual models and explain their limitations.
  17. Students will draw and interpret graphs that describe physical phenomena.
  18. Students will design experiments to test conceptual models.
  19. Students will collaborate to collect and interpret experimental data and to analyze and explain sources of error associated with experimental data.
  20. Students will communicate results of experiments and will write laboratory reports following an accepted format.
  21. Students will develop an appreciation for the history of physics and will understand the relationship between physics and calculus.
  22. Students will use their knowledge of physics to explain phenomena from everyday life.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will take lecture notes and read the textbook to acquire fundamental information.
  2. Students will work independently to solve example problems and assigned problems.
  3. Students will present their solutions to assigned problems to the class.
  4. Students will work collaboratively in small groups to solve problems.
  5. Students will work in small groups to set up and perform laboratory experiments and exercises, and collect and analyze data.
  6. Writing Benchmark: Students will write lab reports, using data and calculations to form conclusions. A report may include the following sections: questions of interest, hypothesis, materials, procedure, data, data analysis, conclusions, and discussion of sources of error.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate their understanding of material presented in lecture through their answers to both low-order and higher-order questions.
  2. Students will demonstrate their understanding through successful completion of assigned homework.
  3. Students will communicate their understanding of principles of physics by presenting at least two problems to the class per grading period.
  4. Students will demonstrate their qualitative and quantitative understanding of material through successful completion of chapter tests.
  5. Students will demonstrate their abilities to analyze data and to communicate effectively by submission of properly organized laboratory reports.
  6. Students will demonstrate their understanding of mechanics and electricity and magnetism by successful completion of semester exams which cover each major area. The two hour exams will each contain 35 multiple choice questions and 3 free response problems. The multiple choice and free response sections will be weighted equally in determining the exam grade.
  7. Students will successfully complete the Advanced Placement Physics C exam.

Science 515 - Environmental Science

Course Title:
SCI515 Environmental Science

Course Description:
This course is one semester.  It is designed to get students into the environment, to get a hands-on perspective on how systems work with an emphasis on ecosystems. Systems-thinking is what this course is all about. What are the components of a system? Students will sample and do research to determine the architecture of a system. How do the components of the system interact? Students will observe systems in the field and manipulate variables and measure system response in the lab.  Students will examine physical factors that influence systems such as atmosphere, heat budgets, water distribution and climate; biological factors such as, population size, agriculture, invasive species and human influence; and ethical issues such as assigning value to system components. Students will take part in campus environmental experiments such as detention pond water quality, biodiesel production, development of alternate energy sources, and campus recycling. The relationship between the environment and economics will be a major focal point.  Grade: 12

Academic Goals:
  1. To develop a systems-thinking mindset. 
  2. To develop an in-depth knowledge of the structure and dynamics of an ecosystem.
  3. To develop a greater appreciation for our interdependence with the environment around us.
  4. To encourage students to wrestle with ethical issues concerning the environment. 
  5. To make students aware of current environmental issues.
  6. To have students improve the McCallie environment in tangible ways such as increasing energy efficiency and improving resource quality.
  7. To encourage students to thnk about their personal impact on the environment.
  8. To have students develop and articulate a personal environmental ethic.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will perform lab and field studies of the campus pond ecosystem using a variety of collection, analytical and observational methods.
  2. Students will develop a sound knowledge base from the text and online sources and prepare answers to questions for class discussions. 
  3. Students will take part in various environmental programs on campus including recycling, biodiesel production, and composting.
  4. Students will be responsible for reading current journal and newspaper articles concerning the environment, presenting a synopsis, and leading class discussions on the article.
  5. Students will be required to keep a personal journal on envrionmental issues.
  6. Students will read, discuss, and write about selections from well known authors in environmental literature (Carson, Leopold, Berry, Abbey, Diamond, etc.).
  7. Students will be required to keep informed of current developments on environmental issues using a variety of sources.
  8. Students will listen to and discuss online presentations such as TED Talks given by world-renown scientists and thinkers.
  9. Students will be challenged to develop renewable resource technologies, such as solar hot water heaters and composters.
  10. Students will be required to interpret graphs, tables, maps, and other data sources.
  11. Students will be required to write one major paper on an environmental issue of their choice and prepare a power point presentation summarizing their research. 
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate their comprehension through homework questions that will be evaluated for their content and depth.
  2. Students will demonstrate their ability to interpret data from various sources and in various formats.
  3. Students will demonstrate the development of their knowledge and thoughtfulness of environmental issues in daily journal entries.
  4. Students will demonstrate their ability to communicate recent developments and issues in environmental science and to lead discussions on these issues.
  5. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of scientific methodology by their ability to cooperatively implement experiments in the lab and the field by planning experiments and collecting, recording, analyzing, and interpreting their data.
  6. Tests will involve application of basic environmental science principles to new scenarios.
  7. As the final exam for the semester, students will demonstrate their ability to research a topic and report their findings in written and visual form.
  8. Enthusiasm, responsibility, and organization will be evaluated on an ongoing basis.

Science 516 - Science of Natural Disasters

Course Title:
SCI516 Science of Natural Disasters

Course Description:
This course will use historical novels to describe how science has evolved to help explain, predict, and mitigate against natural disasters. Three texts will be used. Eric Larson's Isaac's Storm examines the 1900 hurricane that struck Galveston Texas and provides an avenue for discussion of the national weather service's formation. The second test is Storm Warning by Nancy Mathis which looks at the destructive power of tornadoes and how improvements in science have begun to save lives. Finally, Tsunami by Geoff Tibballs uses powerful photography and personal interviews with survivors to explain the destruction carried out by the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami that killed over 280,000 people. Additional materials will be used to understand the mechanisms and effects of weather, volcanoes, earthquakes, floods, wildfires, droughts, and disease.  Grade: 12
 
Academic Goals:
 
1.     Harness students’ interest in natural disasters to further scientific understanding.   
2.     Use factual novels to get students interested in reading and improve reading skills.
3.     Show that science is a multi-faceted, multi-disciplinary, and an evolving thing.
4.     Dramatically display natural phenomena and their impact on society.
5.     Show how science can play an important role in society and learning.
6.     Encourage students to think long term when considering solutions to problems.
7.     Promote academic self confidence.
 
Instructional Methods:
 
1.     Reading   
2.     Small quizzes
3.     Class discussion
4.     Open-ended research assignments
5.     Examination of current events with role playing and presentations   

Evaluation:
 
1.     Reading quizzes   
2.     Multiple choice and short answer tests
3.     Research paper
4.     Class presentations

Science 517 - Astronomy

Course Title:
SCI517 Astronomy

Course Description:
Countless generations throughout history have been fascinated with the night sky and have sought for explanations for the wonders observed in the heavens.  This semester elective course is designed to give students the opportunity to see how the science of astronomy affects our every dat lives and to allow them to become active participants in the quest for a better understanding of the universe.  Topics will include planetary motion, the solar system, moon phases, and constellations.  Principles of light and the methods of observation will also be explored as well as an overview into the most recent exciting discoveries and questions involving black holes, dark energy, and dark matter.  Grade: 12
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will gain an appreciation and excitement for new discoveries in astronomy and will be able to see their relevance within the larger context of natural science.
  2. Students will increase their science literacy through use of astronomical imagery and discussion of phenomena.
  3. Students will develop and expand their physical intuitions in order to promote an interest in experimentation.
  4. Students will develop a deeper understanding of how nature behaves and how the scientific method leads us to develop models of nature that are then rigorously tested.
  5. Students will learn of the recent advances in instrumentation, detection technologies, and advances in computing power that have revolutionized astronomy.
  6. Students will learn to think logically in order to solve problems.
  7. Students will show the ability to work collaboratively on laboratory exercises.
  8. Students will learn research techniques through the use of data bases and reliable internet sources.
  9. Students will use writing skills to present their research findings.
  10. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the content material covered during the semester.

Instructional Methods:

  1. Students will take lecture notes and read the text to acquire fundamental information.
  2. Students will both observe and participate in class demonstrations of physical phenomena.
  3. Students will participate in group laboratory exercises.
  4. Students will work independently and collaboratively on problem-solving exercises.
  5. Students will participate in class debates and discussions to analyze current ideas and concepts in astronomy and examine how they can be applied to other systems.
  6. Students will periodically do independent research on an assigned topic, adequately assess their sources, and write short summaries of their findings.
  7. Students will make astronomical observations outside of the classroom and give oral or written presentations of their findings.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will show their understanding of class material by answering questions posed by the teacher or by other students.
  2. Students will demonstrate a comprehension of physical concepts by taking chapter section quizzes and chapter tests.  Tests and quizzes require the student to give written explanations, draw diagrams, define vocabulary, and solve word problems both mathematically as well as conceptually.
  3. Students will demonstrate their comprehension through homework assignments: reading for comprehension is evaluated by short answer quizzes; review questions emphasize a conceptual understanding and section exercises ask the student to apply those concepts to new situations.
  4. Students will show a depth of understanding and knowledge on a student-chosen astronomical topic by giving a multimedia presentation and written report of an independent research project at the end of the semester.  This project will take the place of a traditional exam.
  5. Grades will be cumulative throughout the semester.  Each grading period will be weighted according to the number of homework assignments, quizzes, and tests given during that period.

Science 518 - Anatomy and Physiology

Course Title:
SCI518 Anatomy and Physiology

Course Description: 
The human body is a complex structure that takes years to completely understand.  This class will give the student a better understanding of how the human body works and what professions are out there in the world of sports medicine.  The student will engage in intriguing lectures and be exposed to a wide array of guest speakers.  This class would be a great advantage for the student wanting to study sports medicine in college or to attend medical school, and that earlier exposure to anatomy, physiology, and medical terminology would put him ahead of the game.  Grade: 11-12
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will learn about the human body and its components.
  2. Students will take away a better understanding of how the human body works in regards to the injury process and everyday activities.
  3. Students will learn relevant medical terminology.  Knowing some of the basic medical terminology will give the students an understanding of what physicians, physical therapists, and athletic trainers are saying when they are being seen as patients.
  4. Students may find that through this course, they become interested in working as student trainers.
  5. Students will be challenged to continually ask questions and explore areas of interest.
Instructional Methods:
 
Evaluation:
  1. The students will be asked to keep a notebook throughout the semester.  The notebook will contain all handouts, class notes, and notes from guest speakers in order from start to finish.  Notebooks will be checked periodically throughout the semester and a grade will be given according to how well the notebook is maintained.
  2. A weekly quiz will be given over the material covered each week.
  3. Tests will be given periodically over materials covered in the classroom.  To ensure learning over time is taking place, many of the tests will be comprehensive.  A midterm and a final will also be given and review days will be held before each examination to make sure that all material that will be covered on the tests has been refreshed in the student's mind.
  4. Class participation will also be a part of the grading process.  Class participation will include taking part in class discussions and answering questions from the teacher or other students.  When it comes to the human body, there are no stupid questions.
  5. Students will be asked to complete journal assignments.  The students will be allowed to choose a topic or at times will be given a topic by the teacher, and the student is to research the topic using medical databases and write up a journal presentation.  Journal format will be given to the students in the syllabus.  There will be 2 - 3 journal assignments during the course of the semester.
  6. Group projects will also be a part of the grading system.  Group projects will include but not be limited to topics such as protective equipment in sports and specific types of injuries.  All project guidelines will be included in the syllabus

Science 519 - AP Environmental Science

Course Title:
SCI519 AP Environmental Science

Course Description: 
The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. The students will participate in hands-on, laboratory and field investigations to apply scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies in order to better understand our natural systems and to critically think about environmental issues and potential solutions.   Environmental science is interdisciplinary, embracing topics from geology, biology, environmental studies, environmental science, chemistry, and geography.  The AP Environmental Science course is an excellent option for any interested and motivated student who has successfully completed one year of laboratory science (Biology or Chemistry) and one year of Algebra.  Grade: 11-12

Science 520 - Organic Chemistry

Course Title:
SCI520 Organic Chemistry

Course Description: 
This course is designed to provide a fundamental overview of organic chemistry to students interested in pursuing a career in the sciences.  Upon successful completion of this class, students will understand the relationship between structure and function of molecules, the major classes of reactions, and how to determine structure via various spectroscopic techniques.  Several themes are prevalent in each unit of study:  nomenclature, chemical and physical properties, structures, mechanisms, common molecules, and the diversity of organic molecules in nature, society, and industry Students will participate in weekly micro-scale labs in which they will safely perform a variety of experiments.  Lab results will be recorded in students’ lab notebooks.  Pre-requisite:  AP Chemistry, AP Biology, a B- or higher in Honors Chemistry, or a B+ or higher in General Chemistry.  Semester course; S1 only.  Grade: 11-12

Science 521 - Techniques in Scientific Research

Course Title:
SCI521 Techniques in Scientific Research

Course Description: 
This course supports students in choosing a relevant research topic, determining the scope of their topic,  completing a comprehensive literature review on their topic, practicing technical writing skills, and learning how to properly report statistical data. Successfully completing these milestones will position students to develop and carry out an independent research investigation in a subsequent school year.  There will be quizzes, tests, a culminating poster presentation of a literature review as well as a rubric-driven, on-topic TED Talk. 

Major units of the course include Determining a Research Topic and Question, Long-term Project Planning, Selecting and Scoping a Research Topic, Searching for and Interpreting Scientific Literature, Conducting a Literature Review, Writing a Research Plan, Constructing Data Tables, Analyzing Quantitative and Qualitative Data, Constructing Results Graphs and Charts, Performing Data Analytics, and Analyzing Abstract Content.  This class is meant for serious science and math students who are interested in learning how to complete an independent research project.  Semester course; S2 only.  Grade: 9-12

Meet the Faculty

Correna Andrews

Correna Andrews

Titles: Science Teacher
Degrees: B.S., University of Memphis
M.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville
M.Ed., University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Email:
Caleb Bagby

Caleb Bagby

Titles: Director of T.E.D. (Innovation and Engineering Labs)
Email:
Callie Burns

Callie Burns

Titles: Science Teacher, Learning Center Specialist
Degrees: B.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Email:
Holly Deeds

Holly Deeds

Titles: Science Teacher
Degrees: B.F.A., University of Tennessee, Knoxville
B.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville
M.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Email:
Neal Dexter

Neal Dexter

Titles: Science Teacher
Degrees: B.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville
M.S., Eastern Kentucky University
Email:
Wayne Fullam

Wayne Fullam

Class of 2003
Titles: Computer Science Teacher
Degrees: Hampden-Sydney College
Email:
Preston Godbold

Preston Godbold

Titles: Science Teacher
Degrees: B.S., Cedarville University
M.S., University of Dayton
Email:

Debbie Lifsey

Titles: Science Teacher
Degrees: B.A., University of Georgia
Email:
Michael Lowry

Michael Lowry

Titles: Science Teacher
Degrees: B.S., Centre College
M.S., Vanderbilt University
Email:
Karah Nazor

Karah Nazor

Titles: Science Teacher
Degrees: Ph.D., University of Kentucky
B.S., James Madison University
Email:
Nancy Olenchek

Nancy Olenchek

Titles: Science Teacher
Degrees: B.S., Eastern Michigan University
M.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Email:
Leo Procise

Leo Procise

Titles: Science Teacher
Degrees: B.S., University of Saint Francis
Ph.D., Old Dominion University
Email:
Scott Shoup

Scott Shoup

Titles: Science Teacher
Degrees: B.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville
M.S., Mississippi State University
Email: