McCallie is an All-Boys Private Boarding School and Day School, a Christian-based College Prep School. 
McCallie seeks out and accepts boys from all ethnic, racial, religious, and socioeconomic backgrounds and places a high value on a diverse student body.

History

The mission of the McCallie School's History Department is to equip boys with the abilities and knowledge to help them draw upon the past as a source of wisdom and understanding for the present. We hope to guide our students into becoming informed, responsible citizens of both their nation and their world. To this end, the department will maintain a vibrant intellectual atmosphere, preserve an academically challenging curriculum, and employ the best practices of both teaching and learning.
 
All McCallie School students gain foundational knowledge and awareness through the survey courses of World History and US History. In addition, a constantly-evolving catalog of semester-long electives allows boys to make in-depth study of focused topics.

McCallie's history classes foster student-teacher and student-student interaction, and they allow boys to practice the art of history within a challenging yet comfortable environment. All courses include a strong emphasis on writing skills and the critical use of primary sources.

Courses

History 110 - Ancient World History

Course Title:
HIS110 Ancient World History

Course Description:
Historians often list six key traits of a Civilization: Concentrated Population, Government, Religion, Specialization, Advanced Technology, and Writing. Today, we take these elements for granted, but while homo sapiens are over 400,000 years old, human civilization is less than 6000 years old! Thus, in a relatively concentrated period of time, humans developed lifestyle standards that still define our world today. In this semester-long course, we will examine the emergence and flourishing of civilizations in the Middle East, India, China, and the Mediterranean World. Students will consider what made each one unique, as well as how they shared common attitudes towards geography, religion, politics, economics, and social order. Grade: 9-10
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Achieve competency in writing short essays that display a beginning level of synthesis and contain proper grammar, syntax, and punctuation.
  2. Develop oral skills for both presentations and discussions. Students will practice the defense and explanations of their viewpoints as well as the analysis of other viewpoints.
  3. Gain proficiency in researching, and in wise use of technology.
  4. Discover and analyze the cause-and-effect of world cultures, WITHOUT judging the people by our own beliefs and standards of conduct.
  5. Use historical knowledge to find the interconnectedness of cultures and time-periods.
  6. Learn to recognize connections between different civilizations
  7. Be challenged to filter information with respectful skepticism. Critical thinking skills will be challenged through active explorations of moral issues, assumptions, and "facts".
Instructional Methods:
  1. Interactive lectures, making use of audio and visual aids, will guide students through main points.
  2. In-class discussions and debates will allow students to explore topics and formulate ideas into their own words.
  3. Small Group projects on specific historical events or people will give students the opportunity to work together, as well as to "become experts" on a particular topic.
Evaluation:
  1. Traditional tests and in-class essays will periodically assess the students' recall and analysis of historical lessons.
  2. Take Home Essays will evaluate students' ability to synthesize historical information and present cogent and coherent arguments.
  3. Creative projects and papers will require students to make "real-world" use of historical information.
  4. Oral presentations and discussions will challenge students' ability to speak in front of their peers.
  5. Periodic quizzes will assess students' ability and/or effort in keeping up with the daily work.

History 113 - American Government

Course Title:
HIS113 American Government

Course Description: 
American Government examines the structure and mechanisms of today's Constitutional Republic.  Beginning with an overview of the development of the two-party system and checks-and-balances, this course will allow study of key documents, personalities, and events that played a role in establishing and maintaining our current system.  The focus will be on the workings of National government, and some time will be given to the relationship between national government and state and local governments.  Grade: 9-10.
 
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will acquire a basic understanding of American government through examination of documents and concepts from 1770's to the present.
  2. Students will demonstrate crucial cognitive skills for the study of government: chronological thinking, governmental/concept comprehension, analysis, and interpretation.
  3. Students will learn and practice a strategy for writing an acceptable academic essay.
  4. Students will learn to recognize the similarities and differences in branches of government as well as in political parties.
  5. Students will develop critical thinking skills by critically analyzing facts, assumptions, and moral judgments.
  6. Students will learn and practice the craft of research, analysis of sources, and synthesis to create, present, and defend a position on important governmental events.
  7. Students will understand and practice the process of evaluating sources both primary and secondary.
  8. Students will be expected to do some supplemental reading of analysis and document based government text.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Speaking and Listening Benchmark: Students will take part in interactive dialogue, making use of audio and visual technology to facilitate oral presentations based on their own research.
  2. Students will use in-class discussions and debates to explore topics and formulate ideas in their own words to insightfully critique and thoughtfully interpret the government around them.
  3. Students will work together in small groups and use primary and secondary sources to explore specific governmental events or figures and create expository essays based on analysis and evidence.
  4. Writing and Research Benchmark: Students will write a series of short papers which encourage good research, composition, and proper citation skills.  These papers will incorporate the skills and techniques of effective writing in the Academic Goals.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will be evaluated through traditional tests and in-class essays that will asses the students' recall and analysis of government materials.
  2. Students will write take-home essays that will evaluate their ability to synthesize historical information and present cogent arguments.
  3. Students will engage in creative projects and papers that will require them to make real-world use of historical information.
  4. Students will conduct oral presentations and discussions that will challenge and improve their ability to speak in front of their peers.
  5. Each semester, students will sit for a ninety minute examination, including, but not limited to, multiple choice, identification, and essays.
  6. Periodic in-class quizzes to asses student progress and commitment to daily assignments.

History 120 - World History Since 1000 (9)

Course Title:
HIS120 World History Since 1000 (9)

Course Description:
World History is a year-long survey course that will cover the foundation of Islam to the end of the Cold War, demonstrating how different cultures have interacted with each other over time to shape a more intertwined and interdependent modern world. Political revolutions, religious wars, agricultural innovations, economic and industrial expansion, and colonization and imperialism have shaped how we view the world. The course will examine how such events in one part of the world triggered a reaction in another and how these reactions were influenced by culture, custom, and fear. Students will also explore what the future of the modern world will be and who will take the lead as the old superpowers of the Twentieth Century struggle to retain their superiority. Grade: 9


Academic Goals:
  1. Acquire a basic understanding of world history through an examination of the major political, social, economic, military, and religious events leading up to the year 1000 following to the present.
  2. Demonstrate crucial cognitive skills for the study of history: chronological thinking, historical comprehension, analysis, and interpretation.
  3. Learn the process of writing a solid academic essay, including, but not limited to use of an introduction with thesis statement, defending body paragraphs, conclusion, and seamless incorporation of textual evidence and quotations to defend and support their argument.
  4. Learn to recognize the similarities and differences in major civilizations over time.
  5. Develop critical thinking skills by the use of respectful skepticism applied to facts, assumptions, and moral judgements.
  6. Be exposed to the cultural, religious, racial, gender, and socioeconomic diversity found in the modern world and learn how to approach historical issues from multiple perspectives.
  7. Develop competent use of the "tools" of the historian's trade, including research and data analysis, note-taking and critical observation, oral presentation, and use of technology to formulate and defend an argument coverning various themes of world history.
  8. Understand and practice the process of evaluating both primary and secondary sources.
  9. Honors section students will be expected to do somewhat more reading at a higher level of difficulty.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Speaking & Listening Benchmark: students will take part in interactive dialogue, making use of audio and visual technology to facilitate oral presentations based on historical research.
  2. In-class discussions and debates to explore topics and formulate ideas in their own words to question, critique, and thoughtfully interpret the world around them.
  3. Work together in small groups and use primary and secondary sources to explore specific historical events or figures in world history and create expository essays and oral reports based on analysis and evidence.
  4. Writing & Research Benchmark: write a short research paper covering various topics of world history that will pay close attention to proper historical research strategies and will use methods for proper citation of outside sources. This assignment will incorporate the skills and techniques of effective composition enumerated in the Academic Goals. Students in the honors section will write more often.
Evaluation:
  1. Traditional tests and in-class essays to assess the students' recall and analysis of historical lessons.
  2. Write take-home essays to evaluate their ability to synthesize historical information and present cogent and coherent arguments.
  3. Engage in creative projects and papers that require them to make "real-world" use of historical information.
  4. Conduct oral presentations and discussions that challenge and improve their ability to speak in front of their peers.
  5. Periodic quizzes to assess students ability and/or effort in keeping up with the daily work.
  6. Students in the regular sections will sit for a two-hour cumulative fall semester exam that includes short essays and identification questions designed to evaluate their ability to tie together various themes of World History. The spring semester exam will be an activity based project focusing on a specific turning point in World History. The final product will be an in-class essay based on research, group work, and individual analysis.
  7. In the honors sections each semester, students will complete a three-hour case presentation as a semester exam. This activity will include a reading, a video presentation, an analysis of primary source material, and a group discussion on the exam day. The exercise will conclude with the writing of a well-reasoned, thorough essay.

History 220 - World History Since 1000 (10)

Course Title:
HIS220 World History Since 1000 (10)

Course Description:
World History is a year-long survey course that will cover the foundation of Islam to the end of the Cold War, demonstrating how different cultures have interacted with each other over time to shape a more intertwined and interdependent modern world. Political revolutions, religious wars, agricultural innovations, economic and industrial expansion, and colonization and imperialism have shaped how we view the world. The course will examine how such events in one part of the world triggered a reaction in another and how these reactions were influenced by culture, custom, and fear. Students will also explore what the future of the modern world will be and who will take the lead as the old superpowers of the Twentieth Century struggle to retain their superiority. Grade: 10

Academic Goals:
  1. Acquire a basic understanding of world history through an examination of the major political, social, economic, military, and religious events leading up to the year 1000 following to the present.
  2. Demonstrate crucial cognitive skills for the study of history: chronological thinking, historical comprehension, analysis, and interpretation.
  3. Learn the process of writing a solid academic essay, including, but not limited to use of an introduction with thesis statement, defending body paragraphs, conclusion, and seamless incorporation of textual evidence and quotations to defend and support their argument.
  4. Learn to recognize the similarities and differences in major civilizations over time.
  5. Develop critical thinking skills by the use of respectful skepticism applied to facts, assumptions, and moral judgements.
  6. Be exposed to the cultural, religious, racial, gender, and socioeconomic diversity found in the modern world and learn how to approach historical issues from multiple perspectives.
  7. Develop competent use of the "tools" of the historian's trade, including research and data analysis, note-taking and critical observation, oral presentation, and use of technology to formulate and defend an argument coverning various themes of world history.
  8. Understand and practice the process of evaluating both primary and secondary sources.
  9. Honors section students will be expected to do somewhat more reading at a higher level of difficulty.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Speaking & Listening Benchmark: students will take part in interactive dialogue, making use of audio and visual technology to facilitate oral presentations based on historical research.
  2. In-class discussions and debates to explore topics and formulate ideas in their own words to question, critique, and thoughtfully interpret the world around them.
  3. Work together in small groups and use primary and secondary sources to explore specific historical events or figures in world history and create expository essays and oral reports based on analysis and evidence.
  4. Writing & Research Benchmark: write a short research paper covering various topics of world history that will pay close attention to proper historical research strategies and will use methods for proper citation of outside sources. This assignment will incorporate the skills and techniques of effective composition enumerated in the Academic Goals. Students in the honors section will write more often.
Evaluation:
  1. Traditional tests and in-class essays to assess the students' recall and analysis of historical lessons.
  2. Write take-home essays to evaluate their ability to synthesize historical information and present cogent and coherent arguments.
  3. Engage in creative projects and papers that require them to make "real-world" use of historical information.
  4. Conduct oral presentations and discussions that challenge and improve their ability to speak in front of their peers.
  5. Periodic quizzes to assess students ability and/or effort in keeping up with the daily work.
  6. Students in the regular sections will sit for a two-hour cumulative fall semester exam that includes short essays and identification questions designed to evaluate their ability to tie together various themes of World History. The spring semester exam will be an activity based project focusing on a specific turning point in World History. The final product will be an in-class essay based on research, group work, and individual analysis.
  7. In the honors sections each semester, students will complete a three-hour case presentation as a semester exam. This activity will include a reading, a video presentation, an analysis of primary source material, and a group discussion on the exam day. The exercise will conclude with the writing of a well-reasoned, thorough essay.

History 221 - AP World History

Course Title:
HIS221 AP World History

Course Description:
World History is a year-long survey course that will cover the foundation of Islam to the end of the Cold War, demonstrating how different cultures have interacted with each other over time to shape a more intertwined and interdependent modern world. Political revolutions, religious wars, agricultural innovations, economic and industrial expansion, and colonization and imperialism have shaped how we view the world. The course will examine how such events in one part of the world triggered a reaction in another and how these reactions were influenced by culture, custom, and fear. Students will also explore what the future of the modern world will be and who will take the lead as the old superpowers of the Twentieth Century struggle to retain their superiority. Grade: 10


Academic Goals:
  1. Acquire a basic understanding of world history through an examination of the major political, social, economic, military, and religious events leading up to the year 1000 following to the present.
  2. Demonstrate crucial cognitive skills for the study of history: chronological thinking, historical comprehension, analysis, and interpretation.
  3. Learn the process of writing a solid academic essay, including, but not limited to use of an introduction with thesis statement, defending body paragraphs, conclusion, and seamless incorporation of textual evidence and quotations to defend and support their argument.
  4. Learn to recognize the similarities and differences in major civilizations over time.
  5. Develop critical thinking skills by the use of respectful skepticism applied to facts, assumptions, and moral judgements.
  6. Be exposed to the cultural, religious, racial, gender, and socioeconomic diversity found in the modern world and learn how to approach historical issues from multiple perspectives.
  7. Develop competent use of the "tools" of the historian's trade, including research and data analysis, note-taking and critical observation, oral presentation, and use of technology to formulate and defend an argument covering various themes of world history.
  8. Understand and practice the process of evaluating both primary and secondary sources.
  9. Honors section students will be expected to do somewhat more reading at a higher level of difficulty.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Speaking & Listening Benchmark: students will take part in interactive dialogue, making use of audio and visual technology to facilitate oral presentations based on historical research.
  2. In-class discussions and debates to explore topics and formulate ideas in their own words to question, critique, and thoughtfully interpret the world around them.
  3. Work together in small groups and use primary and secondary sources to explore specific historical events or figures in world history and create expository essays and oral reports based on analysis and evidence.
  4. Writing & Research Benchmark: write a short research paper covering various topics of world history that will pay close attention to proper historical research strategies and will use methods for proper citation of outside sources. This assignment will incorporate the skills and techniques of effective composition enumerated in the Academic Goals. Students in the honors section will write more often.
Evaluation:
  1. Traditional tests and in-class essays to assess the students' recall and analysis of historical lessons.
  2. Write take-home essays to evaluate their ability to synthesize historical information and present cogent and coherent arguments.
  3. Engage in creative projects and papers that require them to make "real-world" use of historical information.
  4. Conduct oral presentations and discussions that challenge and improve their ability to speak in front of their peers.
  5. Periodic quizzes to assess students ability and/or effort in keeping up with the daily work.
  6. Students in the regular sections will sit for a two-hour cumulative fall semester exam that includes short essays and identification questions designed to evaluate their ability to tie together various themes of World History. The spring semester exam will be an activity based project focusing on a specific turning point in World History. The final product will be an in-class essay based on research, group work, and individual analysis.
  7. In the honors sections each semester, students will complete a three-hour case presentation as a semester exam. This activity will include a reading, a video presentation, an analysis of primary source material, and a group discussion on the exam day. The exercise will conclude with the writing of a well-reasoned, thorough essay.

History 310 - United States History

Course Title:
HIS310 United States History

Course Description:
United States History is intended to introduce students to the civic culture of this nation and focuses on the origins and development of its political, economic, and social institutions. Students will learn to think historically --assembling, organizing, and analyzing information in order to draw logical conclusions from this knowledge. Grade: 11
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will demonstrate an ability to impose order on history through the following periodization:
    1. a. Three worlds meet (beginnings to 1629).
    2. b. Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763).
    3. c. Revolution and the New Nation (1752-1820s).
    4. d. Expansion and Reform (1801-1861).
    5. e. Civil War adn Reconstruction (1850-1877).
    6. f. The Development of the Industrial United States (1870-1900).
    7. g. The Emergence of Modern America (1890-1930).
    8. h. The Great Depression and World War II (1929-1945).
    9. i. Postwar United States (1945-early 1970s).
    10. j. Contemporary United States (1968-Present).
  2. Students will demonstrate an ability to distinguish between past, present and future time.
  3. Students will demonstrate an ability to interpret data presented in time lines.
  4. Students will demonstrate an ability to reconstruct the literal meaning of a historical passage.
  5. Students will demonstrate an ability to identify the central question(s) the historical narrative addresses.
  6. Students will demonstrate an ability to read historical narratives imaginatively.
  7. Students will demonstrate an ability to evidence historical perspectives.
  8. Students will demonstrate an ability to draw upon data in historical maps.
  9. Students will demonstrate an ability to utilize visual and mathematical data peresented in charts, tables, pie and bar graphs, flow charts, Venn diagrams, and other graphic organizers.
  10. Students will demonstrate an ability to draw upon visual, literary, and musical sources.
  11. Students will demonstrate an ability to identify the author or source of the historical document or narrative.
  12. Students will demonstrate an ability to compare and contrast differing sets of ideas, values, personalities, behaviors, and institutions.
  13. Students will demonstrate an ability to differentiate between historical facts and historical interpretations.
  14. Students will demonstrate an ability to consider miltiple perspectives.
  15. Students will demonstrate an ability to analyze cause-and-effect relationships and multiple causation, including the importance of the individual, the influence of ideas, and the role of chance.
  16. Students will demonstrate an ability to challenge arguments of historical inevitability.
  17. Students will demonstrate an ability to compare competing historical narratives.
  18. Students will demonstrate an ability to hold interpretations of history as tentative.
  19. Students will demonstrate an ability to evaluate major debates among historians.
  20. Students will demonstrate an ability to hypothesize the influence of the past.
  21. Students will demonstrate an ability to formulate historical questions.
  22. Students will demonstrate an ability to interrogate historical data.
  23. Students will demonstrate an ability to obtain historical data.
  24. Students will demonstrate an ability to identify the gaps in the available records.
  25. Students will demonstrate an ability to construct a sound historical interpretation.
  26. Students will demonstrate an ability to evaluate the implementation of a decision.
  27. Students will demonstrate an ability to identify issues and problems in the past.
  28. Students will demonstrate an ability an ability to formulate a position or course of action on an issue.
  29. Students will demonstrate an ability to marshal evidence contributing to problems and alternative courses of action.
  30. Students will demonstrate an ability to evaluate alternative courses of actions.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Reading well constructed historical narratives (biographies, literature, and textbook)
  2. Reading documents and providing other records beyond material included in the textbook -- political cartoons, photographs, art, and architecture
  3. Video
  4. Speaking & Listening Benchmark: Students will engage in informal debates as a component of class discussion.
  5. Research and Speaking & Listening Benchmark: Students will perform historical simulations in which they take on the roles of key participants in major historical events after researching those events.
  6. Students will often work in small groups to evaluate and answer questions, often sharing a summary of their responses with the rest of the class.
  7. Research and Writing Benchmarks: Students will practice historical research--locating information in print and electronic media, organizing information, and using information to argue a thesis or to make a presentation.
  8. Speaking & Listening Benchmark: Students will master Socratic seminar skills.
  9. Writing Benchmark: Students will write the following essays: comparison and contrast, change over time, argument in favor of a position, Document Based Question model using primary sources.
Evaluation:
  1. Classroom participation
  2. Major tests (mainly subjective) and out-of-class writing assignments
  3. Quizzes
  4. Writing Benchmark: Three times each semester, students will write 25-minute in-class essays on topics growing out of course material and class discussion to be evaluated with the SAT essay rubric.
  5. Alternative assessments like simulations, debates, oral presentations, and cooperative learning projects
  6. For first semester, students will take a two-part examination. The first part will be CONNECTIONS, where they will select five paired items. They will identify each item in the pair and thoroughly draw connections between the two items. An example: "City Upon a Hill" - Manifest Destiny. The second part of the exam is ESSAY. They choose two from a selection of four and write a solid analytical response. An example: Trace the growth of the national government's power from 1781 to 1848. Students may choose whether to complete the exam outside the classroom, turning it in at their scheduled exam time, or to complete it in class during the scheduled time.
  7. For the second semester exam, students will examine American Cold War diplomacy and answer the following question: Would the Cold War paradigm work in the age of preemption? Students will complete this project outside of class, and it will be due on the set exam day.

History 312 - United States History Honors

Course Title:
HIS312 United States History Honors

Course Description:
The study of our national experience has two purposes: to teach the main lines of our political, social, intellectual and economic history, and to acquire the analytical skills necessary to develop a sophisticated understanding of the process of historical continuity and change. Students use a variety of sources, including maps, graphs, charts, cartoons, audio-visuals, and primary/secondary readings. These materials, including a challenging, college level textbook, help them to understand the relationship between themes and concepts. The course content provides students with an in-depth study of critical moments that have shaped the American nation. This approach to teaching United States history by concepts is based on these assumptions: (1) History is both an evolutionary and a revolutionary process; an accurate historical perspective necessitates analysis of cause-effect relationships. (2) History is comprised of recurring themes. (3) History records efforts of people and nations to solve problems and improve circumstances. An understanding of the past enhances people's wisdom in confronting current and future situations.  Though not required, especially motivated students may study additional material and take the AP Exam in May. Grade: 11
 
Academic Goals:
  1. To write a polished, coherent essay defending a thesis
  2. To exercise high-level thinking skills in analyzing historical developments and in drawing conclusions
  3. To develop an appreciation for ambiguity, skepticism, and complexity
  4. To come to appreciate the ever-changing nature of the discipline
  5. To foster careful and diligent listeners, skilled and attentive readers, and organized and clear writers
  6. To recognize that history is an "argument without end"
  7. To give students a conceptual knowledge of United States history
  8. To focus on political issues, economic developments, social questions, cultural characteristics, and legal/constitutional concerns

Instructional Methods:

  1. Analytical reading (complex and varied primary and secondary sources)
  2. Writing Benchmark: Students will write the following essays: comparison and contrast, change over time, argument in favor of a position, Document Based Question model using primary sources.
  3. Questioning
  4. Participatory lecture
  5. Interpreting non-print materials
  6. Small and large group discussions
  7. Organizing charts
  8. Problem solving
  9. Pooling results of individual research
  10. Speaking & Listening Benchmark: Students will make oral presentations based on individual or group work.
  11. Speaking & Listening Benchmark: Students will engage in informal debates as a component of class discussion.
  12. Research and Speaking & Listening Benchmarks: Students will perform historical simulations in which they take on the roles of key participants in major historical events after researching those events.
  13. Posing "what if" situations
  14. Research and Writing Benchmarks: Students will practice historical research--locating information in print and electronic media, organizing information, and using information to argue a thesis or to make a presentation.

Evaluation:

  1. Classroom participation
  2. Unit tests following the multiple-choice and analytical essay format of the Advanced Placement exam.
  3. Quizzes
  4. Out-of-class writing assignments
  5. Alternative assessments such as simulations, debates, oral presentations, and cooperative learning projects
  6. Writing Benchmark: Two times each semester, students will write 25-minute in-class essays on topics growing out of course material and class discussion to be evaluated with the SSAT essay rubric.

History 313 - AP United States History

Course Title:
HIS313 AP United States History

Course Description:
The study of our national experience has two purposes: to teach the main lines of our political, social, intellectual and economic history, and to acquire the analytical skills necessary to develop a sophisticated understanding of the process of historical continuity and change. Students use a variety of sources, including maps, graphs, charts, cartoons, audio-visuals, and primary/secondary readings. These materials, including a challenging, college level textbook, help them to understand the relationship between themes and concepts. The course content provides students with an in-depth study of critical moments that have shaped the American nation. This approach to teaching United States history by concepts is based on these assumptions: (1) History is both an evolutionary and a revolutionary process; an accurate historical perspective necessitates analysis of cause-effect relationships. (2) History is comprised of recurring themes. (3) History records efforts of people and nations to solve problems and improve circumstances. An understanding of the past enhances people's wisdom in confronting current and future situations. In addition to the intensified course content, some class time is devoted to extensive instruction and practice in expository writing to prepare students for the AP examination in May. Grade: 11
 
Academic Goals:
  1. To write a polished, coherent essay defending a thesis
  2. To exercise high-level thinking skills in analyzing historical developments and in drawing conclusions
  3. To develop an appreciation for ambiguity, skepticism, and complexity
  4. To come to appreciate the ever-changing nature of the discipline
  5. To foster careful and diligent listeners, skilled and attentive readers, and organized and clear writers
  6. To recognize that history is an "argument without end"
  7. To give students a conceptual knowledge of United States history
  8. To focus on political issues, economic developments, social questions, cultural characteristics, and legal/constitutional concerns
Instructional Methods:
  1. Analytical reading (complex and varied primary and secondary sources)
  2. Writing Benchmark: Students will write the following essays: comparison and contrast, change over time, argument in favor of a position, Document Based Question model using primary sources.
  3. Questioning
  4. Participatory lecture
  5. Interpreting non-print materials
  6. Small and large group discussions
  7. Organizing charts
  8. Problem solving
  9. Pooling results of individual research
  10. Speaking & Listening Benchmark: Students will make oral presentations based on individual or group work.
  11. Speaking & Listening Benchmark: Students will engage in informal debates as a component of class discussion.
  12. Research and Speaking & Listening Benchmarks: Students will perform historical simulations in which they take on the roles of key participants in major historical events after researching those events.
  13. Posing "what if" situations
  14. Research and Writing Benchmarks: Students will practice historical research--locating information in print and electronic media, organizing information, and using information to argue a thesis or to make a presentation.
Evaluation:
  1. Classroom participation
  2. Unit tests following the multiple-choice and analytical essay format of the Advanced Placement exam.
  3. Quizzes
  4. Out-of-class writing assignments
  5. Alternative assessments such as simulations, debates, oral presentations, and cooperative learning projects
  6. Writing Benchmark: Two times each semester, students will write 25-minute in-class essays on topics growing out of course material and class discussion to be evaluated with the SSAT essay rubric.
  7. Document-based questions

History 413 - AP European History

Course Title:
HIS413 AP European History

Course Description:
The civilization that developed in Europe over the last 700 years is in many ways the most influential in the modern world. Advanced Placement European History (APE) explores the most important movements and events on the continent from the Renaissance through the fall of the Soviet empire. During these centuries Europeans re-invented their culture, reformed their religion, redefined their view of nature, settled the new World, revolutionized government and the means of production, won and lost great empires outside of Europe, fought the bloodiest wars in history, and made major strides in unifying the continent. Twenty-first century Americans are among the heirs of this civilization, warts and all. A.P.E. is a year long, college level course that covers this exciting period and prepares students for the Advanced Placement European History examination. Grade: 12
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will attain a working knowledge of the history of Europe from the Renaissance to the fall of the Soviet Empire.
  2. Students will develop the habits of mind necessary to study history including: Chronological Thinking, Historical Thinking, Historical Understanding and Interpretation, Historical Research Capabilities, Historical Issues-Analysis and Decision Making.
  3. Students will devote the time and energy necessary to comprehend a wide variety of primary and secondary sources.
  4. Students will focus on writing clear, concise and well-argued essays in defense of a thesis.
  5. Students will practice the historian's craft of marshalling primary and secondary sources to be able to formulate and answer significant historical questions.
  6. Students will improve their skill in writing a solid academic essay.
  7. Students will prepare for and take the Advanced Placement European History Examination in May.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Speaking & Listening Benchmark: Students will lead and participate in Socratic Seminars based on a specific text, whether in print or on film.
  2. Question and answer sessions on the basic narrative of European history.
  3. Analysis of regional and national histories.
  4. In and out of class essay writing.
  5. Video lecture series, "The Western Tradition."
  6. Group projects.
  7. Historiography discussions and debates.
Evaluation:
  1. Multiple choice tests as per the A.P.E. exam.
  2. Essays in and out of class timed and untimed including Document Base Questions and analytical essays as per the A.P.E. exam.
  3. Group projects.

History 430 - African-American History

Course Title:
HIS430 African American History

Course Description:
This course provides students with a social, cultural, and political framework with which to analyze African American history in the broader context of United States and world history.  Utilizing lecture and discussion formats along with Socratic seminars, we will probe the experiences of African Americans during World War I, the Great Depression, and World War II.  Students will examine the role of the church in the African American community as well as study important political leaders and organizations paramount to the African American experience.  The course will emphasize the contributions and achievements of African Americans to the worlds of art, literature, music, and other cultural forms as well as highlight the efforts of bravery, perseverance, and humanity apparent in the transcendence of an institutionalized people.  In short, this course is a survey of African American history from its beginnings.  The African American narrative begins with an account of life on the continent of Africa prior to the 16th century.  Students will consider how rich cultural roots originating in Africa have become intertwined with a broader American culture, and learn to connect the slave's experience (in early U.S. history) to the African experience, history, and culture of their ancestry.  These connections, which will be emphasized for the duration of the course, will allow students to further examine historical changes that shaped and impacted American life.  Topics of further discussion include: African American life in the colonies and the early Republic; triangular trade and the Middle Passage; the development of Plantation slavery; the experiences of "free" blacks in the Antebellum period; the Abolitionist movement; the Civil War and Reconstruction; Jim Crow; the Civil Rights movement; the Great Migration; and the Harlem Renaissance.  Grade: 11-12
 
Academic Goals:
1.  Students will be challenged to critically analyze and decipher the significance of eras, events, conflicts, philosophies, organizations, and people in history relative to contributions made to the African American experience.
2.  Students will learn to juxtapose and make correlations between the causes and effects of historical eras, events, conflicts, philosophies, organizations and people in history.
3.  Students will learn to formulate informed opinions based on historical facts and evidence, and to express their assertions through written evaluations, debates, and classroom discussions.
4.  Students will acquire an appreciation for the plight and institutional challenges imposed on the African American community and culture along with the resolve and perseverance necessary to transcend racial prejudices and inequalities.



Instructional Methods:
1.  Students will complete daily assignments and demonstrate the ability to digest and interpret critical information by taking part in interactive class discussions.
2.  Students will learn to formulate and articulate authentic ideas both orally and through essays to critique and interpret the African American perspective of events that have occurred in US and World history.
3.  Students will make use of audio and visual technology, class lectures, nightly homework assignments, and oral presentations produced by peers to enhance note-taking skills.
4.  Students will work together in small groups to explore topics, historical people, or events utilizing critical thinking skills to construct thoughtful debates developing respect and tolerance for opposing perspectives.
5.  Students will write various compositions ranging from short essays to research papers with the intentions of developing their abilities to synthesize and make use of historical information, and to present thoughtful arguments.

Evaluation:
1.  Students will take a series of quizzes for the purpose of assessing their commitment to daily assignments.  
2.  Students will take a series of chapter tests and in-class essays for the purpose of evaluating abilities to recall and critically analyze historical material.
3.  Students will be assigned a series of take-home essays for the purpose of evaluating their ability to create compelling arguments with credibly supportive facts and to express their ideas with clarity and confidence.
4.  Students will conduct oral presentations and discussions that are intended to improve abilities to speak in front of audiences.
 

History 435 - Anthropology

Course Title:
HIS435 Anthropology

Course Description:
Anthropology will give students an introduction into the subjects involved in the study of humans and more specifically their cultures.  The course will provide an initial overview of Anthropology as a discipline before moving through a variety of case studies that will demonstrate the branches of anthropology as well as research methodology.  After an overview of the subject matter, the course will focus upon five key areas of study and practice: (1) Overview of Anthropology -- what is it, why is it important, how is it used in academia/elsewhere; (2) Physical Anthropology -- its role and its relationship to Cultural Anthropology; (3) Cultural Anthropology -- the importance of culture within the framework of civilization and analysis of culture as a way to find meaning within everyday events; (4) Research methodology -- practical experience with the methods an anthropologist uses to study the world through original student research; and (5) Original Student Research -- written and verbal presentation of original research by the student. Semester course.  Grade: 11-12
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will become acquainted with the major study areas of anthropology.
  2. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the mechanics of evolution and fossil records of human development.
  3. Students will know the major criticisms of the theory of evolution and the questions that make evolution problematic.
  4. Students will view the diversity of the human culture through a study of various societies worldwide, including those of the more "primitive" nature.
  5. Students will look at the world as anthropologists, thereby seeing those different from themselves and of other cultures in their own lights rather than in comparison with a student's own lifestyle or culture.
  6. Students will be able to identify cultural themes within the parsing of current events through the analysis of different news sources.
  7. Students will be able to read, process, and dissect case studies within the field of Anthropology.
  8. Student will improve their writing skills with opportunities to write essays, short research papers and to address a major research paper as their semester exam.
  9. Students will improve their library, research, and internet search skills as they seek information about various assigned topics and a semester long research project.

Instructional Methods:

  1. Primarily, instruction will come through a discussion of readings from the text, but especially from related materials, videos, practical applications and field trips.
  2. At least three field trips are scheduled to take place during the semester: a) to Dayton, TN to visit the Rhea County courthouse and Scopes Museum within our study of culture and evolution; b) to temple mounds that remain at Etowah near Cartersville, Georgia in the study of origins of food production and early settled life; c) a trip to the Great Smoky National Park to address rural life as supplanted by Government relocation and address recreational culture within modern America.
  3. Some practical application will take place as the students will participate in "fieldwork" in relation to research of one or more class projects.  Fieldwork will involve the student observing or directly interviewing subjects on matters of specific culture.
  4. The class will use some video and internet instruction to help explain points made about anthropology and to view various cultures as examples of different life styles.
  5. Students will occasionally be asked to do research into various topics and to inform their classmates of some anthropological information or give examples of it.
  6. Throughout the course of the semester, students will work on a research project of their paper and an oral presentation of their choice. At the end of the semester, each student will present a written research paper and an oral presentation of their finding to their classmates.
  7. Oral presentation skills should improve as students discuss various topics in class, present findings in occasional assignments, and give a major presentation on their research topic for their final exam.
  8. Speaking & Listening Benchmark: Students will lead and participate in Socratic Seminars based on a specific reading or film.

Evaluation:

  1. Traditional tests and in-class essays will periodically assess the students recall of information as we progress through the semester. Tests will be taken in college-type "blue books" and will be in the form of written identification and essays.
  2. Take home essays and short research assignments will be grades according to the SAT Essay Writing Rubric that McCallie School has adopted for grades 10-12.
  3. Occasional quizzes over readings and homework assignments will be given as needed.  Some may be unannounced.
  4. Short oral presentations will be graded to basic standards of McCallie School's public speaking classes.
  5. The final "exam" counting one-third of a student's final grade will consist of a semester-long research project covering a cultural anthropological topic of the student's choice. The grade will be cumulative as students meet various "deadlines" to have progressive portions of the paper finished. A oral presentation to the class of their findings will also be a part of this final exam. The written paper will be 3/4 of each student's final exam grade, and the oral presentation will be 1/4 of the student's final exam grade.

History 440 - Contemporary World Issues

Course Title:
HIS440 Contemporary World Issues

Course Description:
Contemporary World Issues is a semester long elective offered to seniors. The course focuses on geo-political and economic issues of the 21st Century. Adopting a thematic, rather than chronological approach, students will explore the historical context and contemporary issues of topics such as Global Warming, Genocide, Nuclear Proliferation, Alternative Energy Sources, and the ongoing war in Iraq. Other topics studied include the impact of natural resources on violent conflict, the 2008 presidential election primary campaign, immigration, and globalization and the rise of Asia. Making use of the latest in books, news stories and editorials, students will debate and defend multiple points of view through discussions, simulations, and presentations. This course will be approximately 1/3 lecture and 2/3 seminar & activities. Grade: 11-12
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Explore in depth:
    1. The debates over alternative energy sources and global warming.
    2. Discussing what defines genocide and the motivations behind and responses to genocide historically with a specific examination of the ongoing genocide in the Darfur region of the Sudan.
    3. Globalization's impact on trade, job growth, AIDS, and healthcare quality.
    4. China as an emerging world power and its impact on the international economy and international security environment.
    5. The dangers of and responses to nuclear proliferation.
    6. The ongoing war in Iraq and U.S. policy options regarding the armed conflict.
    7. Discussing the best policy for dealing with illegal immigrants - deportation, amnesty, guest worker status, path to citizenship?
    8. Discovering the impact natural resources have on violent conflict, such as the mining of diamonds to fund rebel groups in Sierra Leone in the 1990's
    9. Studying the institution of the United States Presidency and discussing what qualities and traits a president must possess along with a specific candidate's personal background and policy stances
  2. Listen attentively and discuss and debate constructively:
    1. Much of the course will be class discussion of issues, all of which have a minimum of two sides.
    2. Much of the course will be students reading and researching and "hashing out" the issues in discussion and debate.
    3. Students will experience the need to "think on their feet" as well as understand an opponent's argument in order to counter it.
  3. Read with comprehension at literal, figurative, and critical levels. Frequently our readings and discussions will be at odds with stereotypes and generalizations. Other readings will be "propaganda style" articles that perpetuate assumptions. Students will need to understand the differences, and recognize the authors' purposes.
  4. Think creatively, analytically, and independently. Reading primary and secondary sources will allow students to explore alternative thoughts and views, always with the personal goal of "figuring out the truth."
  5. Write clearly, logically, and imaginatively. Students will be assessed through a variety of written assignments (essays, responses to articles, proposals) that require coherent thought and logical argument.
  6. Tolerate ambiguity. For every instance that counters a stereotype or assumption concerning a given topic there is an instance that supports it. Thus, "figuring out the truth" will be more difficult than one might think. Students will discover that sometimes there is more than one correct answer -- and that sometimes there might not be one at all!
  7. Develop a joyful curiosity, develop individual talents and interests, and commit to learning through challenging work. Since this is an elective course, the student should be motivated by actual interest and curiosity. Individual academic success and intellectual development in this course will stem largely from the effort each student is willing to give.
  8. Appreciate cultural, religious, racial, gender and socioeconomic diversity. The topics will require students to empathize with multiple sides of the debates, as well as analyze and evaluate actions.
  9. Filter information with respectful skepticism. The propaganda services for all sides of the various issues are talented, resourceful, and indefatigable. Students will experience the need to carefully examine thoughts and claims from the media, official spokesmen, and “academic experts” in the hope of gaining an accurate/realistic interpretation of today's events.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Interactive lectures, making use of audio and visual aids, will introduce students to each topic.
  2. In-class discussions and debates will allow students to explore the multiple facets to each topic and formulate ideas into their own words.
  3. Small group projects on specific developments or people will give students the opportunity to work together, as well as to "become experts" on a particular topic.
Evaluation:
  1. Take home essays will evaluate students’ ability to synthesize information and present cogent and coherent arguments.
  2. Creative projects, such as simulations, will require students to make “real-world” use of historical information.
  3. Oral presentations and discussions will challenge students’ ability to speak in front of their peers.
  4. For the final exam, students will participate in a mock Middle East Peace Summit by representing one of the countries of that region. Students will be divided into country delegations and each student will be required to give an oral presentation on their country's particular stance on either the Iraq War, the Israeli-Palestinian process, or Iran's nuclear proliferation activities. After giving their presentations, students will be expected to defend their position against questions from other "countries" Each student will be required to provide a written component of the final project, which analyzes one of the three topics above from not only their country's perspective, but their own as well.

History 445 - The Civil War and Reconstruction

Course Title:
HIS445 The Civil War and Reconstruction

Course Description: 
The Civil War and Reconstruction is a one-semester senior elective which thoroughly examines the greatest challenge faced by the United States of America.  From the origins of American slavery to debates about states’ rights and federalism to increasing geographic polarization in the 19th century, from southern secession to the battles of First and Second Bull Run, Shiloh, and Gettysburg, the course covers the causes, events, and effects of America’s Civil War.  After 1865, we will concentrate our attention on the nation’s response to the war, the abolition of slavery, and the Reconstruction of the South and entire nation.  Grade 11-12
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will acquire an understanding of the events of American history related to the American Civil War and Reconstruction periods, including the people, politics, major events, and geography.
  2. Students will demonstrate cognitive skills for the study of history: chronological thinking, historical comprehension, analysis, and interpretation.
  3. Students will understand and practice the process of evaluating sources, both primary and secondary.
  4. Students will develop research and writing skills through projects, essay assessments, and a research paper.
  5. Students will critically analyze major themes, debates, and decisions of the time.
  6. Students will encounter the issues of diversity beyond the battlefield, specifically those of race, gender, economics, religion, class, and culture.
  7. Students will examine the historiography of the period as well as practice the historian's task of research, reflection, and reexamination.
  8. Students will attend to the lessons of leadership and courage found in the study of central figures (not limited to Garrison, Douglass, Lincoln, Lee, and Washington).
Instructional Methods:
  1. Writing Benchmarks: students will write a variety of essays (compare and contrast, persuasive, document-based) as well as one research paper.  These papers will incorporate the skills and techniques of effective writing in the Academic Goals.
  2. Speaking and Listening Benchmarks: students will lead and take part in Socratic discussions, memorize, and recite the Gettysburg Address, engage in one formal debate, and participate in lectures/discussions over class material.
  3. Research Benchmarks: students will not only construct a research paper, but also complete a research project.  Both assignments require research and citation skills of primary sources like maps, speeches, photographs, etc., as well as secondary sources.
  4. Students will use in-class lectures, discussions, videos, and readings to explore the various topics and ideas of the course.
  5. Students will visit local Civil War battle sites.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will be evaluated through traditional tests and in-class essays, including a semester examination.
  2. Students will compose a research paper that will require use of various sources as well as proper citations.
  3. Students will complete a research project that will require use of various sources and the student's personal creativity.
  4. Students will work in pairs to prepare for and engage in a formal debate.
  5. Students will memorize and recite Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address.
  6. Students will encounter periodic in-class quizzes to assess reading comprehension and general progress.
 

History 450 - Introduction to Economics

Course Title:
HIS450 Introduction to Economics

Course Description:
This course is designed to help teach young men a general knowledge of economics, accounting, business law, personal finance, and investment. Grade: 12
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will develop an understanding of economic forces that have contributed to the story of people in the United States and in the world.
  2. While the class is principally about learning basic economic principles such as Supply and Demand, Equilibrium, Surplus and Shortage, Profit, and Money, emphasis is on applying these principles to the world around them.
  3. Students will learn the basics of investments and retirement savings, with special emphasis on the time value of money.
  4. Students will study the economic precedents of the Great Depression, World War II, and The Cold War. In addition, students will learn the economic principles behind government regulation and government involvement in markets.
  5. Students will read excerpts from both primary and secondary sources with reference to Economic History and the theories of John Maynard Keynes, Milton Friedman, and Adam Smith.
  6. Students will pursue the critical understanding and interpretation of analytical data as presented in functions and graphs, the development of problem-solving strategies in light of economic principles, and critical analysis of proposed solutions to socioeconomic problems.
  7. Price controls, minimum wage laws, barriers to competition and to free trade, and surpluses and shortages will be studied in some depth.
  8. Students will be encouraged to cultivate academic self-reliance and intellectual risk-taking. They will be required to approach social and governmental "solutions" to socioeconomic problems with analysis based upon economic principles. Both group and individual assignments will supplement learning. Through their analysis, students will learn to understand that ambiguity is not only inevitable, but is often the result of solid analysis based upon different assumptions. As they learn to think like economists, they will become more comfortable with filtering information with respectful skepticism. Students are encouraged to question everything.
  9. Much time will be spent on the concept of world markets, free trade, and global interdependence. If schedules allow, they will participate in an international trade competition at Middle Tennessee State University, competing as economic advisors to a foreign country. They will do extensive research into the economy of their assigned country, and develop a plan to improve standards of living there.
  10. Students will learn to read and analyze written material. They are encouraged to read more than one opinion on a particular topic, i.e., minimum wage and environmental regulations.
  11. Frequently the class will enter into discussions about ethical dilemmas and the economic parameters that impact the dilemma. Students will be required to consider the costs and benefits of actions and to allow for the null hypothesis. For instance, the class will discuss the problem of organ shortages and some ideas for solutions. Students will have to decide for themselves which of their suggestions they consider less costly.
  12. The course will conclude with a study of macroeconomic concepts. Students will learn to synthesize what they have learned about scarcity and economic analysis with regard to national priorities. They will be able to determine costs and benefits of lower or higher interest rates, more or less unemployment, faster or slower economic growth, inflation or deflation, a stronger or a weaker dollar, and more or less international free trade.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will be encouraged to research data upon which they base their assumptions and frequently will find that their assumptions are incorrect. They will develop sound economic reasoning to buffet the beliefs that they hold.
  2. Interactive lecture comprises much of the class time.
  3. Students will participate in games and learning activities.
  4. Students will participate in individual and group research projects.
  5. Students will participate in oral and written reports.
  6. Students will complete a research assignment about an economic aspect of a topic that he/she chooses. Students will be encouraged to take a topic in which they have expressed some curiosity or previous knowledge. Often, when subjected to hard research and analysis, students find that their previous assumptions and opinions are challenged.
  7. Students will participate in an internet forum for intellectual discussion. Approximately every two weeks the teacher will post a question, or provocative statement, or economic problem on the forum. Students will be required to post their own thoughts about the topic and to respond to the posting of one or more of their peers. Only Economics students may participate in the forum at this time. The online discussion will be largely controlled by the students, but will be monitored by the teacher.
  8. Students will participate in the Stock Market Game and other competitive academic activities. Some travel may be required to facilitate these competitions.
    1. Students will register at www.aplia.com for the class and participate in online assignments and experiments.
    2. In the spring semester, students will participate in the International Economics Trade Summit. This is a day long activity in which students will compete in teams to be the best "economic advisors" for various countries.
Evaluation:
  1. Assessment is based upon student-demonstrated understanding through traditional tests, written and oral presentations of research and analysis, and knowledge demonstrated in class discussions.
  2. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the principles of Economics through performance on standard tests, writing research assignments, and participation in role-playing and simulation activities.
  3. Emphasis will be placed upon the ability to clearly explain economic phenomena using the vocabulary of an economist.
  4. Students will develop an approach to problem solving utilizing cost/benefit analysis and should demonstrate skill in explaining their reasoning.

History 455 - AP Microeconomics/Macroeconomics

Course Title:
HIS455 AP Macroeconomics/Microeconomics

Course Description:
This course, while separated into two semesters, works like a yearlong course. The first semester is spent introducing students to both Macroeconomics and to Microeconomics. Students will do intensive research on Macroeconomic research relative to a specific country and represent that country at the International Trade Summit activity in February. Students will concentrate on learning the intricacies of Microeconomics in the Spring. Both semesters are specifically designed to prepare students for both the Advanced Placement Macroeconomics and Advanced Placement Microeconomics exams. This course will go into significantly more depth and analysis than the Introductory Economics course. Students will learn to understand and communicate the subtle complexities of economic analysis and to apply that analysis to current events. This AP course will also include more macro-economic analysis, emphasizing measurement of economic performance, national income and price determination, economic growth, international finance, exchange rates, and balance of trade. The Advanced Placement Exam in Economics is actually two exams, microeconomics and macroeconomics. Students are expected to take both exams. Two Semester course. Students will be required to register for the APLIA online textbook. The entire text is available online as well as online assignments and experiments. Grade: 12


Academic Goals:
  1. Students will learn to apply economic principles to problem solving analysis.
  2. They will learn to look objectively at problems that challenge their assumptions about economic systems and of the world.
  3. Intellectual risk-taking will be encouraged. Students will be challenged to perform as "intellectuals", that is, one who enjoys ideas and takes pleasure from playing with them.
  4. Fundamental to the science of economics is an appreciation for ambiguity. Students will learn that "what you see depends upon where you sit."
  5. Students will be encouraged to "question everything"; to test complex theories of economics against their own research and experiences.
  6. Global interdependence and trade are key elements of the course. Students will learn that wealth is created through free trade between free people. Emphasis will be on the importance of property rights and freedom to economic well being and wealth creation.
  7. Students will be challenged to write both logically and persuasively. The Advanced Placement exam contains "free response" questions which students will learn to answer with a combination of graphing and verbal economic analysis.
  8. Graphing is key to the science of economics and students will learn to create and manipulate graphs and other economic models.
  9. Students will confront ethical dilemmas such as drug addiction, organ shortages, poverty, endangered species protection, environmental protection, and the challenges of globalization. They will be challenged to create workable solutions to problems by employing economic analysis.
  10. Students will use technology to research and manipulate data. They will be asked to gleen pertinent information and to discard irrelevant data.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will work Advanced Placement macro and micro economic test materials, and take model advanced placement exams. Students will be expected to clearly answer "free response" questions as offered in previous Advanced Placement tests.
  2. Extensive reading will be required and discussion, both in class, and via the web forum, will be integral to the class.
  3. Guest speakers may be utilized to add realism and/or depth to the test preparation material.
  4. Students should learn to become independent learners and will therefore be encouraged to attempt to answer questions that may push them beyond their level of comfort. Students are expected to break down an economic problem and search out information helpful to a sound analysis of that problem, without being specifically instructed by the teacher about how to attack the problem.
  5. During the spring semester, students will participate in an International Economics Trade Summit. In this day-long activity, students will compete the be the best "economic advisors" for their chosen countries.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate mastery of the concepts of economics through their performance on mock advanced placement exams, and through their participation in class discussion.
  2. Students will also be evaluated on their effort and persistence in taking responsibility for their own learning. They will be evaluated on their willingness to attempt problems that stretch them beyond their level of comfort.

History 471 - Seminar in Psychology

Course Title:
HIS471 Seminar in Psychology

Course Description:
Psychology will introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings. The course will cover, but is not limited to, human personality issues; neuroscience; the basics of psychology as a science; topics in social, abnormal, and evolutionary psychology; principles of learning; intervention and therapy; and child and adolescent development. The course will merge science with a broad human perspective, engaging both mind and heart. Studying psychology will enhance the ability to practice critical thinking, to restrain judgment and to combat stigma with compassion and illusion with understanding. Through analysis and introspection, the student will link psychology with topics in today’s world for a better understanding of it and his own emerging sense of self. Semester Course. Grade: 12

 

 

Academic Goals:
  1. History of psychology:
    1. Philosophy as it applies to psychology.
    2. Individuals who have created psycho-philosophy.
  2. Thinking critically with psychological science:
    1. Development of psychology as an empirical science.
    2. Research strategies used by psychologists.
    3. The characteristics of the critical thinker.
    4. Errors of thought and opinion to which humans are prone.
    5. Explanations of intuition and common sense.
    6. Ethical issues in research with/on humans.
    7. Purpose and basic concepts of correlation and experimentation.
  3. Neuroscience:
    1. Everything psychological is simultaneously biological.
    2. The action of the neuron.
    3. The biochemistry of neurotransmitters.
    4. The mechanism of anti-psychotic, anti-anxiety, and anti-depressant medications.
    5. The biological basis of drug addiction.
    6. The brain: structures and functions.
    7. The brain: integration, complexity, plasticity, and evolution.
    8. Left-right brain identification and research.
  4. Evolutionary psychology:
    1. Definition.
    2. Implications for understanding the human species.
    3. Explanations of universal behaviors.
    4. Explanations of gender behavioral difference
    5. Understanding of the importance of the capabilities and functions of the frontal lobe
  5. Child development:
    1. The competent newborn.
    2. Brain development and reorganization.
    3. Piaget's theory of the stages of cognitive development.
    4. Temperament.
    5. Child-rearing practices.
  6. Adolescence:
    1. Definition of the adolescent.
    2. Cognitive development.
    3. Moral development.
    4. Erickson's theory on the stages of adolescent and adult psychosocial development.
    5. Death and dying.
    6. Gender differences in moral and cognitive development
  7. States of consciousness:
    1. Characteristics of sleep.
    2. Theories used to explain and interpret dreams.
    3. Basic phenomena and uses of hypnosis.
    4. Near-death experience.
    5. Identification and understanding of dualism and monism.
    6. Surrealism movement in art
  8. Learning:
    1. Principles of classical conditioning.
    2. Principles of operant conditioning.
    3. Understanding the distinction made between negative reinforcement and punishment.
    4. Principles of reinforcement.
    5. Observational learning and reciprocal determinism
  9. Memory:
    1. Understanding of explicit and implicit memory.
    2. Controversy over memory repression and reconstruction.
  10. Personality:
    1. Definition of personality.
    2. Understanding of the characteristics of the psychoanalytic, social-cognitive, humanistic, and trait perspectives approaches to personality identification.
    3. Assessment tools used in personality.
    4. Extraversion and introversion.
    5. Personal assessment and explanation of type using the MBTI and/or the Enneagram.
    6. Major theorists: Freud, Jung, Rogers, Ellis, Maslow, and Eysenck.
    7. Self-concept, self-esteem, self-serving bias.
    8. Loci of control and learned helplessness.
  11. Psychological disorders:
    1. Dissociative Identity Disorder.
    2. Schizophrenia
    3. Depression
  12. Therapy:
    1. Prominent methods--psychoanalytic, cognitive, humanistic, rational-emotive and biomedical--used to treat people with disorders.
    2. Recognition of effective therapies matched with specific disorders.
    3. Effectiveness, in general, of therapy.
    4. Prevention strategies that promote competence and build resilience.
  13. Stress:
    1. Sources of stress.
    2. Biological and psychological effects of stress.
    3. Cognitive and behavioral strategies for dealing with stress.
  14. Social psychology:
    1. Conformity, bystander effect, altruism, and obedience.
    2. Sources of bias, prejudice, and discrimination.
    3. Cognitive dissonance, attribution, role
    4. Power of the group: groupthink, group polarization, social loafing
  15. Emotion
    1. Lie Detection
    2. Theories of anger, fear, happiness; anxiety
    3. Lie Detection
    4. Phobia and phobia poem
    5. Components of Emotional Intelligence
  16. Students will apply basic knowledge of content to new and novel psychological descriptions, case studies, and perspectives.
  17. Students will define his own emerging sense of self in psychological terms and theories.
  18. Students will prepare a PowerPoint presentation.
  19. Students will write precise, clear, logical, and creative essays which combine psychological fact, personal example/anecdote, and evaluation.
  20. Collaborate and cooperate in learning tasks.
  21. Participate in small group discussions.
  22. Participate in partner assessments.
  23. Discuss constructively:
    1. The Question of the Day.
    2. Current, timely issues directly answered and addressed by psychological study.
  24. Students will confront and analyze ethical dilemmas.
    1. Psychologist/patient privilege
    2. Experimentation on human and animal subjects
  25. Students will recognize opinions generated from poor scientific methodology.
  26. Students will respond appropriately to a number of different assessment/evaluation instruments.
  27. Students will complete tasks thoroughly, thoughtfully, and proudly.
  28. Students will read scientific monographs and abstracts with comprehension.
  29. Students will recognize and analyze psychological reference and theory in literature, theatre, history, art history, music, and film.
  30. Students will explore the connection between mathematics and statistical sampling, validity, and correlation.
  31. Students will read with comprehension at literal and critical levels.
  32. Students will listen actively by asking thoughtful questions and responding to questions.
  33. Students will improve skills of note taking from lecture.
  34. Students will approach life with curious skepticism and respectful humility.
  35. Students will continue interest in topics of psychology.
  36. Students will recognize psychological perspectives, theories, and tenets in everyday life.
  37. Students will better understand and continue to define their sense of self.
  38. Students will better understand and accept others.
  39. Students will recognize a sensitive and moral obligation to the mentally ill.
  40. Students will recognize the all-too-human tendencies for errant judgment and perception.
  41. Students will demonstrate a joyful curiosity about the topics of psychology.
  42. Students will appreciate the wonder of the brain and the implications for continued study of this frontier.
  43. Students will recognize the personal behaviors and attitudes necessary for mental health.
  44. Students will seek to reduce the stigma attached to mental disorder and abnormal behavior.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Classroom discussions.
  2. Lecture for active listening and note-taking skills.
  3. Overheads.
  4. Charts/diagrams.
  5. Videos.
  6. Questionnaires which seek to elicit self-knowledge and personal responses, traits, and attitudes.
  7. Demonstrations and models.
  8. Articles and essays from Oliver Sacks, Kay Redfield Jamison, F. Scott Fitzgerald (to gain an appreciation for psychology in the field and real life).
  9. Articles from periodicals (e.g., Psychology Today, Time, and The New Yorker), and newspapers.
  10. Anecdotal responses and report.
  11. Guest lecturers (e.g., Curtis Baggett).
  12. True-False/Believe-It-Or-Not worksheets of common myths discredited by psychological research.
  13. Five-Minute Answers (broad, timely question of interest or import from the textbook, e.g., "Is there such a thing as hypnotic age regression?, Is it safe to generalize from a sample?" answered.
  14. Question of the Day (to link the day’s lecture topic with personal evaluation and relevance).
  15. Questions from the textbook.
  16. WebSearches on dissociative identity disorder and schizophrenia.
  17. Student produced and taught PowerPoint presentation on a person in psychology: biographical information, placement of the person in context of world events and history, contribution to the study of psychology, selected quotations, definition of psychology, and list of books/articles.
  18. Student produced and taught presentations on topic of choice (e.g., bipolar disorder, depression, serial killers).
Evaluation:
  1. Open notes/notebook multiple choice, matching tests whose questions measure application and analysis of basic knowledge.
  2. Quizzes on reading assignments.
  3. PowerPoint presentation: thoroughness of information, working knowledge of the subject matter, precise, concise, and systematic slide presentation.
  4. Film Project: assessment of a psychological disorder observed in a character in a film chosen by the student. Summary of film's plot; knowledge of issue/psychological disorder, preparation of outline, Works Cited page; essay written in the first person that describes the disorder and makes an honest plea for eliminating the stigma of mental illness.
  5. Student evaluations of project presentations.
  6. Personal essays: one- to one and a half-page response to a topic covered in lecture: a combination of psychological fact, personal anecdote and example, and reflection. (Option: oral presentation to and then discussion with the teacher).
  7. Student self-evaluation of personal essays.
  8. WebSearch: information prepared in detailed outline form.
  9. Partner test: open notebook test done with a partner; calls for cooperation and discussion.
  10. Five-Minute Answers: completeness and relevance of information.
  11. Final Assignment: set of five or six essays (500-750 words) which combine personal reflection and revelation with psychological principles studied throughout the semester. This project demands the delineation and analysis of questions, thoughts and goals for the future, as well as organization, insight, creativity, and honesty.

History 472 - History of Rome

Course Title:
HIS472 History of Rome

Course Description:
This course will provide a general study of the Roman World, from the mythological origins of Rome in Troy to the ascendancy and decline of the empire. It will also provide insight into the gifts of the Romans to our modern world through influence in government models, ideals of citizenship, religion, and the role of global authority. In addition, we hope to make the history of Rome a living one through the study of great figures from Roman history and details of Roman life through reading of primary sources. Though Latin is not a prerequisite, it might be helpful. Grade: 12
 
Academic Goals:
1.       Topics to be covered include:
a.       Mythological origins of Rome (Aeneas in Troy, Romulus and Remus)
b.       The Roman Kings
c.        The Roman Republic
d.       The Social Wars and Class Struggles
e.       Roman Military Expansion
f.        The Civil Wars and Collapse of the Republic
g.       The Emergence of the Empire
h.       The Roman Emperors
i.         Collapse of the Roman Empire
 
Evaluation:
1.       Research Paper (boys will be provided with options so as to maximize interest in their research subject)
2.       Tests (short answer and essay tests to evaluate understanding of overarching topics)
3.       Quizzes (small and frequent quizzes to evaluate acquisition of details from reading and class lecture)
4.       Homework Assignments will be given nightly

History 473 - Ancient Middle Eastern History

Course Title:
HIS473 Ancient Middle Eastern History

Course Description:
This course is a survey of the political, social, and religious events and developments of the Mediterranean World in the era between the close of the Old Testament and the beginning of the New Testament.  These years are often regarded as "The Silent Years" because very little is mentioned in the closed canon of Scripture regarding developments during this time.  To the ancient historian, these centuries are anything but silent and are of great importance when considering names such as Cyrus, Darius, Alexander the Great, and Herod the Great.  To the student of religion, these centuries are equally important because of the influences and changes in Israel and Judaism that paved the way for Jewish culture and thought that would develop over the next 2,000 years.  This course will begin with the study of the rise of the Persian Empire in 539 B.C. and conclude with the ascension of Rome as the dominant world power in 63 B.C. through New Testament time.  Grade: 11-12
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will gain knowledge of the history, civilizations, literature, and culture of the Mediterranean world during the period between the Old Testament and New Testament. 
  2. Students will gain an understanding of the political, social, cultural, and religious history of Hellenistic influence on the Mediterranean world.
  3. Students will gain an understanding of the influence and change in Israel and Judaism during this period in history.
  4. Students will gain an understanding of the literary and religious developments within Israel and Judaism during this period.

History 480 - History of the Sixties

Course Title:
HIS480 History of the Sixties

Course Description:
The “Sixties” have been termed “revolutionary,” and a time when “our country was on fire.”  This elective will investigate the volatile decade of the 1960’s (and up to 1974), giving students a much more in depth look into some of our more recent history. A period of radical social upheaval, political infighting and violence, international tension and brinkmanship, a rise in both pop and counter cultures, and technological innovation, this decade represents a transformative era for American society, one that still defines us to a large degree. As with any great story or history class, we will begin with some contextual history, a quick study of the social, political, and economic and foreign policy considerations that came from Eisenhower’s America and the 1950’s. From there, the class will explore the election of 1960 and both the reality and myth of the John F. Kennedy presidency, the Johnson and Nixon administrations, nuclear proliferation and brinkmanship, the growth and success of the Civil Rights movement, the Space Race, the surge of violence in the Middle East, the Vietnam War, the rise of new liberal movements both here and abroad, and the profound changes in American culture including music, fashion and social behaviors. The class will conclude with an analysis of the Watergate Scandal and its longstanding political aftermath. We will incorporate the rich visual and auditory resources of the day, a few relevant documentaries and films, art, music, fashion as well as text. The class will include a culminating research project allowing students to explore a topic of their choice in greater detail. Semester course. Grade: 11-12

Meet the Faculty

Jake Altemus

Jake Altemus

Titles: Director of Outdoor Programs, History Teacher, Head Climbing Coach
Degrees: B.A., Warren Wilson College
M.A., Appalachian State University
Email:
Chris Carpenter

Chris Carpenter

Class of 1996
Titles: Director of Upper School Academic Affairs, History Teacher, Founders Dorm Head
Degrees: B.A., University of Tennessee, Knoxville
M.Ed., University of Memphis
Email:
Keith Chapin

Keith Chapin

Titles: History Teacher
Degrees: B.A., College of Charleston
M.A., Lee University
Email:
Tom Herring

Tom Herring

Titles: History Teacher
Degrees: M.A., The Citadel
B.A., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Email:
Ryne Linsley

Ryne Linsley

Titles: History Teacher
Degrees: B.A., Auburn University
Email:
Skeeter Makepeace

Skeeter Makepeace

Titles: Economics Teacher
Degrees: B.A., UNC - Chapel Hill
Email:
Sean McCourt

Sean McCourt

Titles: History Teacher, Head Crew Coach
Degrees: B.S., Boston University
Email:
Randy Odle

Randy Odle

Titles: History Department Head, History Teacher
Degrees: B.A., University of the South
M.A., St. John's College
Email:
Duke Richey

Duke Richey

Class of 1986
Titles: History Teacher, Sen. Howard H. Baker, Jr. Chair of American History
Degrees: B.A., University of the South
M.S., M.A., University of Montana
Ph.D., University of Colorado
Email:
Ryan Wadley

Ryan Wadley

Titles: Dean of Residential Life, History Teacher
Degrees: B.S., Tenn. Temple University
M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Email: