McCallie is an All-Boys Private Boarding School and Day School, a Christian-based College Prep School. 
McCallie seeks out and accepts boys from all ethnic, racial, religious, and socioeconomic backgrounds and places a high value on a diverse student body.

Foreign Languages

To begin a new language is to step into a new world. To speak a new language and study it is to explore the cultures of those who speak the language. To master a language is to walk among its people and its countries and understand, communicate and appreciate.
Languages encourage those who study them to taste and touch and hear and see and feel.
 
The Foreign Language Department at McCallie supports the active learning needs of boys through a program that stresses active participation and communication. Boys at McCallie participate in a language by speaking, listening, reading, and writing, using materials that are authentic to the culture of the language. Through a process of language immersion in the classroom, boys learn to communicate effectively in the target language.

Courses

Languages 110 - Latin 1

Course Title:
LAN110 Latin 1

Course Description:
The primary objectives of Latin 1 are for the student to gain a comprehension of the Latin language through practice in reading it and to develop through these readings an understanding of the social and political history of the Romans. Grade: 9-11
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will learn:
    1. The six tenses of the indicative mood: present, imperfect, future, perfect, pluperfect, and future perfect for all regular, and some of the most common irregular verbs.
    2. Verb conjugations: how to recognize patterns and how to produce forms in each category.
    3. Declensions 1-5 in all cases.
    4. The infinitive and its uses.
    5. Adjectives: all forms of adjective declension, concepts of agreement with nouns, uses as a substantive, possessive adjectives.
    6. Imperative mood, positive and negative.
    7. Use and declension of demonstrative pronouns HIC, ILLE.
    8. How the Latin language shapes questions.
    9. How it orders longer sentences with subordinate clauses headed by dum, postquam and quod
  2. Students will learn extensive English derivatives from Latin vocabulary.
  3. Students will demonstrate knowledge of Roman culture, history, myth and art.
    1. Chapter 1: how to view artifacts, the Roman family
    2. Chapter 2: the Gracchi, Roman women
    3. Chapter 3: Roman dress, the Roman villa
    4. Chapter 4: Aeneas myth, the Trojan War
    5. Chapter 5: childhood in the Ancient World
    6. Chapter 6: Roman slavery, Roman crafts and art
    7. Chapter 7: Roman wall painting, houses and villas
    8. Chapter 8: paterfamilias, Daedalus and Icarus
    9. Chapter 9: Etruscans, major Gods and Goddesses
    10. Chapter 10: Treatment of Slaves, manumission
    11. Chapter 11: Roman names, the founding of Rome, Faustulus, Romulus, Remus
    12. Chapter 12: pottery, pastimes
    13. Chapter 13: Roman roads, the Appian Way
    14. Chapter 14: Rome in the period of kings, the Horatii, the tragedy of Lucretia
    15. Chapter 15: the Golden Milestone
    16. Chapter 16-17: additional myths
    17. Chapter 18: heroes of early Rome, Horatius
    18. Chapter 19: graffiti, travel
    19. Chapter 20: hospitality, the Early Republic, War on the fringes
    20. Chapter 21: Greek origins and influence, nobility, myth of Mucius
    21. Chapter 22: life on the frontiers (Britain), Vercingetorix, Caesar, the Roman army
    22. Chapter 23: aqueducts, engineering
    23. Chapter 24: life on the frontiers (Africa), Punic Wars, cultural assimilation, the Arch of Titus
    24. Chapter 25: Roman forum, the city of Rome
    25. Chapter 26: Rome becomes a world power, Scipio, the Muses
    26. Chapter 27: chariot racing, the Circus Maximus
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will produce Latin sentences based upon their knowledge of Latin syntax.
  2. Students will translate daily in class and will complete exercises focusing on target grammatical topics.
  3. Cultural lessons discussing the daily life of Ancient Romans and the history of the Roman Republic and Empire and its chief characters will be delivered at the end of each chapter.
Evaluation:
  1. Students' skills will be evaluated through frequent assignments.
    1. Daily homework assignments will be evaluated for completion and/or accuracy.
    2. In-class assignments will be evaluated.
    3. Participation and active engagement is expected and part of evaluation of in-class work.
    4. Students will work both independently and in groups on different tasks and skills.
    5. Students will present work to the class on a regular basis, both in formal presentation and informal discussion.
  2. Students will demonstrate their continued and cumulative acquisition of Latin vocabulary through frequent quizzes.
  3. Students demonstrate their knowledge of Latin grammar and syntax by producing Latin forms both in exercises and in charts and by producing Latin sentences focused on target grammatical concepts.
  4. The Semester Exams will be cumulative examinations of the grammatical topics, acquired vocabulary, and cultural topics examined to date. Students will be asked to translate passages, identify the form and function of selected words, produce charts, forms, and sentences in Latin based upon the topics covered to date.

Languages 120 - Spanish 1

Course Title:
LAN120 Spanish 1

Course Description:
This introductory course, taught almost entirely in Spanish, is designed to engage students from the onset in elementary, though, real-life communicative exchanges in speaking, listening, reading and writing in Spanish. Class time and teaching techniques are based in part on the theory of second language acquisition called "Comprehensible Input". According to this theory, students will acquire language to the extent that they are engaged with language that they comprehend, in oral or written form. Therefore, as much class time as possible is used to provide students with meaningful comprehensible input in Spanish. Use of culturally authentic materials and realia, music, periodicals, and video, enhances cultural awareness and offers topics for class discussion. The course also integrates the teaching of study strategies, habits and skills that are unique to vocabulary and grammar acquisition in order to foster more independent learners. Grade: 9-11
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will train themselves to speak only Spanish in the classroom and grow to be proud of the atmosphere created in such an environment.
  2. Students will master, in speaking and writing, the vocabulary presented in the text plus any team-generated supplements.
  3. Students will learn and implement the most effective study strategies for acquiring a second language.
  4. Students will be able to form basic questions, orally and in writing, using the following two constructions:
    1. Subject-verb inversion with or without question words
    2. Statement plus some tag. (¿No?, ¿Verdad?)
  5. Students will be able to narrate a story, in the present tense, based on picture cues, both orally and in writing, following the “Guidelines for a Great Narration.", adhering to the structural norms of the language. 
  6. Students will learn to use periphrastic structures in terms of the categories “Desires, Obligations and Abilities."
  7. Students will systematically work with authentic materials to enhance reading and listening comprehension skills.
  8. Students will demonstrate in writing and speaking an understanding and conrol of the grammatical principals of agreement. (noun-adjective, subject-verb)
  9. Students will demonstrate an awareness of cultural differences between the U.S. and Spanish-speaking countries within the context of major holidays.
  10. Students will understand that there is no single “Spanish or Latin-American” culture, but that each country has its own unique customs and culture as often seen in music, food, dress and certain vocabulary and expressions.
  11. Students will begin to understand that Spanish grammatical structure is logical only in its own context. Spanish is not a translation of English.
  12. Students will learn the fundamental rules governing the use of personal pronouns.
  13. Students will begin to use circumlocutory strategies in order to expand vocabulary and to maintain an all Spanish environment in the classroom.
  14. Students will train themselves to use the course website to access online activities and quizzes outside of class.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Teachers will use "TPRS" as primary method of imparting language to students. 
  2. Classes will be conducted in Spanish and students will not be allowed to speak English without specific permission from teacher.
  3. Teachers will provide students with a list of foreign language study strategies at the beginning of the year, show them how to put them to use for maximum benefit, and periodically check that students are using them in practice.
  4. Teachers will provide students with a list of desired learning outcomes at the beginning of every new unit.
  5. Teachers will create reading and listening comprehension activities in which students work, individually or in groups, with authentic and/or teacher-generated text to gain insight into culture, vocabulary and linguistic structures.
  6. Teachers will intentionally use the quotidian procedures of class to highlight and review appropriate vocabulary and structures in the language.
  7. Teachers will require that students use appropriate physical gestures to support their oral production of the language.
  8. Teachers will use cadences and rhythms to support the presentation and learning of key idiomatic expressions.
  9. Teachers will assign nightly written and/or online homework to be checked on a daily basis for credit.
  10. Teachers will instruct students in the use of the course website and assign online exercises for each unit.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate periodic progress on vocabulary acquisition and grammar through announced and unannounced in-class written and aural quizzes as well as repeatable, online quizzes.
  2. Students will demonstrate progress in speaking and listening comprehension through periodic assessment of their speaking as well as their level of participation and engagement in class activities.
  3. Students will demonstrate understanding and communicative control of learning goals per unit through major tests for the majority of the units in the curriculum.
  4. Students will demonstrate speaking ability through at least one formal oral presentation to the class supported by PowerPoint.
  5. Students will demonstrate nightly engagement with Spanish through homework assignments.
  6. On both semester and final written exams, students will demonstrate knowledge and use of vocabulary and grammar through responses to specific written questions and "cloze" exercises. They will demonstrate their ability to write in the language through a paragraph narration based on sequenced picture cues. They will demonstrate their ability to formulate and answer questions through a guided dialog.(English prompts) They will demonstrate reading comprehension in the language by answering specific questions about a passage they will read.
  7. Students will demonstrate understanding and control in speaking through a Final Oral Interview at the end of the spring semester. This interview consists of two parts. In the first, the student answers direct and open-ended questions of the instructor. In the second, the student narrates the events of a story as depicted in a series of picture cues.
  8. Students will demonstrate aural comprehension through a Final Listening Comprehension exam at the end of the spring semester.

Languages 140 - Chinese 1

Course Title:
LAN140 Chinese 1

Course Description:
Mandarin Chinese is a truly foreign language spoken by nearly 25% of the earth's population and is the major mode of communication within the world's next great superpower. Language is inherent in culture and being as such, knowledge and respect for both Chinese culture and tradition are essential to students building successful rapport with the Chinese. Emphasis on speaking and listening skills will be at a primary especially during the first couple months of the semester to ensure students have a solid linguistic foundation before Chinese characters are introduced into the curriculum. By year's end, students will be able to engage in basic communicative activities in a culturally appropriate manner, and will have memorized between 100 and 200 of the most commonly used Chinese characters.Grade: 9-11
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will develop the skills necessary to learn Mandarin Chinese both in a formal setting as well as individually.
  2. Students will gain a broad understanding of, and deep appreciation for Chinese culture, tradition, and history.
  3. Students will become orally proficient in a wide variety of basic communicative activities ranging from simple greetings to giving directions.
  4. Students will memorize between 100 and 200 of the most commonly written Chinese characters.

Languages 160 - German 1

Course Title:
LAN160 German 1

Course Description:
This course is designed as a beginning German course or for the student who has already completed two years of language study in high school. No prior experience with German is required, but the pace and depth will be appropriate for students who are not new to language study. Students explore German language and culture, drawing from material that is typical of traditional first and second year German courses. The class is conducted mostly in German, so students quickly learn to use the language in everyday situations.
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will train themselves to speak only German in the classroom and grow to be proud of the atmosphere created in such an environment. 
  2. Students will learn and implement the most effective study strategies for acquiring a second language. 
  3. Students will learn periphrastic structures in terms of the categories "Desires, Obligations, and Abilities." 
  4. Students will demonstrate in writing and speaking an understanding of the grammatical principles of agreement. (noun-adjective, subject-verb, article-noun) 
  5. Students will learn the German-speaking countries and capitals, as well as the different states inside Germany. 
  6. Students will begin to understand the use of pronouns and the declension system of nouns, adjectives, and articles.
  7. Students will learn to use the Internet to further enrich the classroom experience through use of realia to increase vocabulary.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Classes will be conducted mostly in German and students will not be allowed to speak English without express permission from the instructor. 
  2. Instructors will provide the students with a list of foreign language study strategies at the beginning of the year, show them how to put them to use for maximum benefit, and periodically check that students are using them in practice.
  3. Instructors will provide appropriate setup for paired and group activities (oral questioning, demonstration, etc.).
  4. Instructors will create reading and listening comprehension activities in which students work, individually or in groups, with authentic and/or instructor-generated text to gain insight into culture, vocabulary, and linguistic structures.
  5. Instructors will use the computer, handouts, and overhead transparencies and other technologies to present students with visual prompts from which they must narrate, individually or in groups, the story line represented in the pictures.
  6. Instructors will create role-play situations in which students must creatively engage in order to accomplish some targeted task.
  7. Instructors will intentionally use the quotidian procedures of class to highlight and review appropriate vocabulary and structures in the language.
  8. Instructors will require that students use appropriate physical gestures to support their oral production of the language.
  9. Instructors will explore the efficacy of using cadences and rhythms to support the presentation and learning of key idiomatic expressions.
  10. Instructors will assign nightly homework.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate periodic progress on vocabulary acquisition and grammar through frequently announced and unannounced written and oral quizzes.
  2. Students will demonstrate understanding and communicative control of learning goals per unit through major tests for the majority of the units in the curriculum.
  3. Students will demonstrate nightly engagement with German through homework assignments that will be evaluated daily. Collective homework grade may not exceed 10 percent of unit total.
  4. Students will demonstrate understanding and control in speaking through a Final Oral Interview at the end of the spring semester.
  5. Students will demonstrate aural comprehension through a Final Listening Comprehension exam at the end of the spring semester.

Languages 170 - Italian

Course Title:
LAN170 Italian

Course Description:
Giacomo Leopardi (Italian poet, 1798-1837) wrote, "Un vocabolario puo contenere solo una piccolo parte del patrimonio di una lingua," or, "a dictionary can embrace only a small part of the vast tapestry of a language." Introduction to Italian is to be a communicative, culture-based approach for beginning students of Italian. Traditionally, language instructors have sought ways to teach and assess the four skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. One of the goals of this course, using the Pronti…Via textbook and its supplementary materials, is to develop concurrently a fifth skill we want our students to achieve: cultural competency. The course is open to juniors and seniors who have completed their language requirement.

Languages 210 - Latin 2

Course Title:
LAN210 Latin 2

Course Description:
The Latin narrative begun in the first year continues with an in-depth look at Roman culture while students encounter additional forms and syntax, including the passive voice and the subjunctive mood. Latin 2 proceeds at a less rapid pace than the honors section; by the end of the year students read slightly adapted versions of original Latin prose.Grade: 9-12
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will learn:
    1. The relative, interrogative, intensive, determinative pronouns, as well as reviews of the personal, reflexive, indefinite, and demonstrative pronouns.
    2. Various degrees of adjectives and the indefinite adjective.
    3. Various degrees of Latin adverbs.
    4. Various uses of the Latin words UT and QUAM.
    5. Cardinal and ordinal numbers.
    6. Further uses of the Genitive, Accusative, and Ablative cases, with addition of the Locative Case.
    7. Translation and forms of Passive Verbs.
    8. Compound verbs.
    9. Various forms of the Latin infinitive and its use in complementary and indirect statement constructions.
    10. Translation and forms of all Latin participles.
    11. Deponent and Semi-Deponent Verbs.
    12. Translation and forms of Subjunctive Verbs and their use in cum clauses, indirect questions, result clauses, indirect commands, and purpose clauses, as well as the Sequence of Tenses and its governing role over uses of the subjunctive mood.
    13. Frequentative, Impersonal, and Inceptive Verbs.
    14. The irregular verbs fio and malo, along with the verbs volo, nolo, sum, possum, eo, and fero.
    15. The ablative absolute.
  2. Students will learn extensive English derivatives from Latin vocabulary.
  3. Students will demonstrate knowledge of:
    1. Aspects of Roman private life, ranging from education and households to daily social life, public entertainment, and cultural events.
    2. Public life and political strife and success in the Roman Republic.
    3. Roman Mythology.
    4. Relevant derivations of modern medical and legal terminology from Latin origins.
    5. Major historical and literary figures and geography of the city and empire.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will listen to a professional dramatic reading of the Latin narrative accompanied by the text projected on the classroom screen from the CD-Rom.
  2. Students will read Latin aloud from the projected text and then translate into English.
  3. Students will be asked to explain the syntax of words appearing in the texts.
  4. Students will read and write out translations from their textbooks.
  5. Students will hear explanations of new grammatical concepts, forms, and translations, as well as reviews of past grammatical points and the incorporation of new material into material already encountered.
  6. Students will practice and review Latin grammar with regular textbook and workbook exercises.
  7. Students will read in English about Roman culture, society, and history and join class discussion about the particular area being studied.
  8. Students will engage in English to Latin translation exercises at regular intervals to review material and incorporate new grammatical concepts.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate their competency in all the above areas through:
    1. Regular vocabulary quizzes on each chapter.
    2. Comprehensive tests at regular intervals on both new and past material.
    3. Semester exams on the cumulative material to date. The exam will contain translation as well as questions dealing with grammar and culture. As the exams are cumulative, students are responsible for all material leading up to the exam in question.
    4. Tests and exams will have questions on culture, grammar, reading comprehension, and Latin composition.

Languages 212 - Latin 2 Honors

Course Title:
LAN212 Latin 2 Honors

Course Description:
The Latin narrative begun in the first year continues with an in-depth look Roman culture while students encounter additional forms and syntax, including the passive voice and the subjunctive mood. Latin 2 Honors proceeds at an accelerated pace; by the end of the year students read unadapted Latin prose.Grade: 9-12
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will learn:
    1. Participial phrases.
    2. Gerundive of obligation.
    3. Cum clauses.
    4. Indirect questions.
    5. Purpose and result clauses, indirect commands with ut.
    6. Further uses of the Genitive, Ablative cases.
    7. Stages 26-31.
    8. Relative purpose clauses and clauses of characteristic.
    9. Ablative absolute.
    10. Conditional sentences.
    11. Fearing clauses.
    12. Present subjunctive active.
    13. Present passive indicative.
    14. Indirect statements and relative time.
    15. Present indicative deponent.
    16. Gerund phrases.
    17. Imperfect subjunctive passive and deponent.
    18. Perfect subjunctive active.
    19. Future perfect indicative passive.
    20. Indirect statement with passive and deponent infinitives.
    21. Gerundives to show purpose.
    22. Present subjunctive passive and deponent.
    23. Future simple deponent.
  2. Students will learn extensive English derivatives from Latin vocabulary.
  3. Students will demonstrate knowledge of:
    1. The temple complex of Aquae Sulis.
    2. The town and its people.
    3. Curse tablets.
    4. Military life in Roman Britain.
    5. Gnaeus Iulius Agricola (AD 42-8?).
    6. Stages 26-31.
    7. Role of the Emperor and the way he worked.
    8. Social life of the Emperor's household and his associates.
    9. The conventions of marriage among the wealthy.
    10. The institution of patron-client.
    11. Industry in Rome.
    12. Philosophers in Rome.
    13. The historical background of the reign of Domitian.
    14. Roman plays (pantomimi).
    15. Roman marriage.
    16. Family life.
    17. The advisors and friends of the Emperor.
    18. The trial and downfall of a Roman Senator.
  4. Students will discuss various themes:
    1. Change of fortune and its place in classical literature and religion.
    2. Social structure and contrast between rich and poor.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will listen to a professional dramatic reading of the Latin narrative accompanied by the text projected on the classroom screen from the CD-Rom.
  2. Students will read Latin aloud from the projected text and then translate into English.
  3. Students will be asked to explain the syntax of words appearing in the texts.
  4. Students will read and write out translations from their textbooks.
  5. Students will read "About the Language" sections in the textbook that explain new grammar principles.
  6. Students will do "Practicing the Language" exercises to reinforce these principles.
  7. Students will read in English about Roman culture, accompanied by worksheets that ask key questions about their reading assignments.
  8. Students will particpate in class discussions in English about Roman society and culture.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate their competency in all the above areas through:
    1. Regular vocabulary quizzes on each stage.
    2. Derivative worksheets and quizzes.
    3. Comprehensive tests at the end of each stage on both new and past material.
    4. Semester exams on the cumulative material to date.
    5. Tests and exams will have questions on culture, grammar, reading comprehension, and derivatives in the form of paradigm formation (the declension of nouns, participles, and adjectives and synopses of verbs), translation of sight (i.e. previously unseen) passages and prepared translations, grammatical exercises focusing on recently learned grammatical concepts, and multiple choice identification and sentence completion questions.

Languages 220 - Spanish 2

Course Title:
LAN220 Spanish 2

Course Description:
Students in Spanish 2 continue to develop their language skills through intense interaction with Spanish in both written and spoken forms. To this end, class time is devoted to providing students with meaningful comprehensible input using strategies in line with the "TPRS" model of instruction. More frequent use of culturally authentic materials and realia, music, periodicals, and video, enhances cultural awareness and offers topics for class discussion. A fundamental aspect of the course is the move toward communicative proficiency in past tense as well as present tense narration of events.Grade: 9-12


Academic Goals:
  1. Students will continue to gain greater control and deeper understanding of the language as prescribed in the learning goals document for Spanish I.
  2. Students will master, in speaking and writing, the vocabulary presented in the text plus any team-adopted supplements.
  3. Students will continue to speak only Spanish in the classroom unless specific permission is granted from the instructor to use English.
  4. Students will develop the ability to narrate stories in the past in both spoken and written forms. (present perfect, imperfect, past progressive, preterit and pluperfect tenses)
  5. Students will learn to communicate their requests, recommendations, hopes, desires and emotions, as they pertain to the actions of others, using the present subjunctive mood.
  6. Students will learn informal command forms to tell others what to do.
  7. Students will learn to incorporate reflexive verbs into their writing and speaking.
  8. Students will expand on idiomatic structures within the categories of “Desires, Obligations and Abilities” as set forth in Spanish I.
  9. Students will learn the adjectives of nationality of the Hispanic countries.
  10. Students will continue to use instructor's web pages as resource to practice skills outside of class.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Classes will be conducted in Spanish and students will not be allowed to speak English without specific permission from teacher.
  2. Teachers will provide students with a list of foreign language study strategies at the beginning of the year, show them how to put them to use for maximum benefit, and periodically check that students are using them in practice.
  3. Teachers will provide students with a list of desired learning outcomes at the beginning of every unit.
  4. Teachers will create reading and listening comprehension activities in which students work, individually or in groups, with authentic and/or teacher-generated text to gain insight into culture, vocabulary, and linguistic structures.
  5. Teachers will intentionally use the quotidian procedures of class to highlight and review appropriate vocabulary and structures in the language.
  6. Teachers will require that students use appropriate physical gestures to support their oral production of the language.
  7. Teachers will instruct students in the use of their respective on-line teaching pages.
  8. Teachers will make students aware of inherent cadences and rhythms in key idiomatic expressions and highlight them to support their presentation and learning.
  9. Teachers will assign nightly written and non-written homework to be assessed on a regular basis for credit.
  10. Teachers will include TPRS (Total Physical Response Storytelling) methods to maximize "comprehensible input" of target language.
  11. Speaking & Writing Benchmark: Students will develop the ability to narrate stories in the past tense, both orally and in written form, based on picture cues following the "Guidelines for a Great Narration." Student control of Preterit - Imperfect interplay is crucial to this skill development.
  12. Reading & Listening Benchmark: Students will systematically work with authentic materials to enhance reading and listening comprehension skills.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate periodic progress on vocabulary acquisition and grammar through frequent announced and unannounced, in-class and on-line quizzes.
  2. Students will demonstrate progress in speaking and listening comprehension through periodic formal and informal assessment of their speaking as well as their level of participation and engagement in class activities. Formal evaluations of the students' speaking will be based upon the common departmental rubric for assessment.
  3. Students will demonstrate understanding and communicative control of learning goals, per unit, through major tests for the majority of the units in the curriculum.
  4. Students will demonstrate nightly engagement with Spanish through homework assignments that will be evaluated on a regular basis. Satisfactory completion of homework also may be assessed by way of periodic quizzes.
  5. Students will demonstrate understanding and control in writing and reading all of the learning goals of the semester through comprehensive semester and final exams. Students will demonstrate knowledge and use of vocabulary and grammar through responses to specific written questions and "cloze" exercises. They will demonstrate their ability to write in the language through a paragraph narration based on sequenced picture cues. These narrations will be evaluated based upon the common departmental rubric. They will demonstrate their ability to formulate and answer questions through a guided dialog.
  6. Students will demonstrate understanding and control in speaking through a taped speaking sample at the end of the first semester and through a formal Oral Interview at the end of the second semester. Evaluation will be based upon the common departmental rubric for speaking.

Languages 222 - Spanish 2 Honors

Course Title:
LAN222 Spanish 2 Honors

Course Description: 
This course is designed for high achieving Spanish students who have both the demonstrated ability and the aspirations to continue their language development through AP Spanish Language during their junior or senior year.  Students continue to develop these skills through intense interaction with Spanish in both written and spoken forms.  To this end, class time is devoted to providing students with meaningful comprehensible input using strategies in line with the “TPRS” model of instruction.  Frequent use of culturally authentic materials, music, periodicals, and video enhances cultural awareness and offers topics for class discussion.  A fundamental aspect of the course is the attainment of communicative proficiency in past tense as well as present tense narration of events.  Students must complete Spanish 1 with a minimum grade of A- in order to qualify for this course.
 

Academic Goals:
  1. Students will continue to gain greater control and deeper understanding of the language as prescribed in the learning goals document for Spanish 1.
  2. Students will master, in speaking and writing, the vocabulary presented in the text plus any team-adopted supplements.
  3. Students will continue to speak only Spanish in the classroom unless specific permission is granted from the instructor to use English.
  4. Students will develop the ability to narrate stoires in the past in both spoken and written forms (present perfect, imperfect, past progressive, preterit, and pluperfect tenses).
  5. Students will learn to communicate their requests, recommendations, hopes, desires, and emotions, as they pertain to the actions of others, using the present and imperfect subjunctive in noun clauses.
  6. Students will learn informal and formal command forms to tell others what to do.
  7. Students will incorporate reflexive verbs into their writing and speaking.
  8. Students will expand on idiomatic structures within the categories of "desires, obligations, and abilities" as set forth in Spanish 1.
  9. Students will learn the adjectives of nationality of the Hispanic countries.
  10. Students will continue to use instructor's web pages as resource to practice skills outside of class.
  11. Students will complete one activity for "Espanol Mio" each grading period in which they incorporate the Spanish language into their personal lives and interests and give a presentation demonstrating what they have learned.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Classes will be conducted in Spanish and students will not be allowed to speak English without specific permission from the teacher.
  2. Teachers will provide students with a list of foreign language study strategies at the beginning of the year, show them how to put them to use for maximum benefit, and periodically check that students are using them in practice.
  3. Teachers will provide students with a list of desired learning outcomes at the beginning of every unit.
  4. Teachers will create reading and listening comprehension activities in which students work, individually or in groups, with authentic and/or teacher-generated text to gain insight into culture, vocabulary, and linguistic structures.
  5. Teachers will intentionally use the quotidian procedures of class to highlight and review appropriate vocabulary and structrues in the language.
  6. Teachers will require that students use appropriate physical gestures to support their oral production of the language.
  7. Teachers will instruct students in the use of their respective on-line teaching pages.
  8. Teachers will make students aware of inherent cadences and rhythms in key idiomatic expressions and highlight them to support their presentation and learning.
  9. Teachers will assign nightly written and non-written homework to be assessed on a regular basis for credit.  The great majority of this work will be reading in the target language with accompanying acitivities designed to further comprehension.
  10. Teachers will include TPRS (Total Physical Response Storytelling) methods to  maximize "comprehensible input" of target language.
  11. Teachers will use online interactive activities and quizzes to help students improve vocabulary acquisition/recall and develop greater grammatical precision.
  12. Teachers will use story-based interactive classroom activities, guidelines for a great narration, and departmental rubrics for speaking and writing for guiding students in the process of improving their speaking and listening skills.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate periodic progress on vocabulary acquisition and grammar through frequent announced and unannounced in-class and on-line quizzes.
  2. Students will demonstrate progress in speaking and listening comprehension through periodic formal and informal assessment of their speaking as well as their level of participation and engagement in class activities.  Formal evaluation of the students' speaking will be based upon the common departmental rubric for assessment.
  3. Students will demonstrate understanding and communicative control of learning goals per unit, through comprehensive skill assessments for the majority of the units in the curriculum.
  4. Students will demonstrate nightly engagement with Spanish through written and on-line homework assignments that will be evaluated on a regular basis.  Satisfactory completion of homework also may be assessed by way of periodic quizzes.
  5. Students will demonstrate their ability to write in the language through a paragraph narration based on a series of picture cues.  They will also demonstrate their ability to formulate and answer questions through a guided dialog.
  6. Students will demonstrate understanding and control in speaking through a digital audio recording at least one time per grading period plus two additional oral assessments to be included as a required element of the semester and final exams.
  7. Students will demonstrate comprehensive abilities through periodic evaluations designed to assess the passive skills of reading and listening as well as the productive skills of speaking and writing.  These evaluations measure what students are able to do with language as opposed to what they know about the language.
  8. Students will demonstrate listening and reading comprehension by answering questions about narrative passages in audio or text format.

Languages 240 - Chinese 2

Course Title:
LAN240 Chinese 2

Course Description:
Students in Chinese 2 continue to develop their language skills through intense interaction with Chinese in both written and spoken forms. Chinese is the primary mode of communication and students are pushed to gain a stronger grasp of linguistic complexities. More frequent use of culturally authentic materials and music, periodicals, and video, enhances cultural awareness and offers topics for class discussion. A fundamental aspect of the course is the move toward communicative proficiency in past tense as well as present tense narration of events. Grade: 9-12
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will develop the skills necessary to continue learning Mandarin Chinese both in a formal setting as well as individually.
  2. Students will continue to gain a broad understanding of, and deep appreciation for, Chinese culture, tradition, and history.
  3. Students will continue to become orally proficient in a wide variety of basic communicative activities ranging from simple greetings to giving directions.
  4. Students will memorize between 100 and 200 of the most commonly written Chinese characters.

Languages 260 - German 2

Course Title:
LAN260 German 2

Course Description:
This course is designed as a continuing German course for the student who has already completed German 1 in high school.  Students explore German language and culture, drawing from material that is typical of traditional second year German courses. The class is conducted mostly in German, so students quickly learn to use the language in everyday situations.
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will train themselves to speak only German in the classroom and grow to be proud of the atmosphere created in such an environment. 
  2. Students will learn and implement the most effective study strategies for acquiring a second language. 
  3. Students will learn periphrastic structures in terms of the categories "Desires, Obligations, and Abilities." 
  4. Students will demonstrate in writing and speaking an understanding of the grammatical principles of agreement. (noun-adjective, subject-verb, article-noun) 
  5. Students will learn the German-speaking countries and capitals, as well as the different states inside Germany. 
  6. Students will begin to understand the use of pronouns and the declension system of nouns, adjectives, and articles.
  7. Students will learn to use the Internet to further enrich the classroom experience through use of realia to increase vocabulary.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Classes will be conducted mostly in German and students will not be allowed to speak English without express permission from the instructor. 
  2. Instructors will provide the students with a list of foreign language study strategies at the beginning of the year, show them how to put them to use for maximum benefit, and periodically check that students are using them in practice.
  3. Instructors will provide appropriate setup for paired and group activities (oral questioning, demonstration, etc.).
  4. Instructors will create reading and listening comprehension activities in which students work, individually or in groups, with authentic and/or instructor-generated text to gain insight into culture, vocabulary, and linguistic structures.
  5. Instructors will use the computer, handouts, and overhead transparencies and other technologies to present students with visual prompts from which they must narrate, individually or in groups, the story line represented in the pictures.
  6. Instructors will create role-play situations in which students must creatively engage in order to accomplish some targeted task.
  7. Instructors will intentionally use the quotidian procedures of class to highlight and review appropriate vocabulary and structures in the language.
  8. Instructors will require that students use appropriate physical gestures to support their oral production of the language.
  9. Instructors will explore the efficacy of using cadences and rhythms to support the presentation and leraning of key idiomatic expressions.
  10. Instructors will assign nightly homework.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate periodic progress on vocabulary acquisition and grammar through frequently announced and unannounced written and oral quizzes.
  2. Students will demonstrate understanding and communicative control of learning goals per unit through major tests for the majority of the units in the curriculum.
  3. Students will demonstrate nightly engagement with German through homework assignments that will be evaluated daily. Collective homework grade may not exceed 10 percent of unit total.
  4. Students will demonstrate understanding and control in speaking through a Final Oral Interview at the end of the spring semester.
  5. Students will demonstrate aural comprehension through a Final Listening Comprehension exam at the end of the spring semester.

Languages 310 - Latin 3

Course Title:
LAN310 Latin 3

Course Description:
The Latin narrative continues (Unit 3) in Roman Britain and proceeds to Rome itself. Increasingly complex sentence structure is introduced. Students continue in Unit 4, where they will read excerpts from real Roman authors at the end of the year. Grade: 10-12
 
Academic Goals:
  1. After a comprehensive review of basic Latin grammar, students will demonstrate a fluency in translating Latin prose and poetry.
  2. Students will read about the political events of the first centuries BC and AD and discuss their impact on the world.
  3. Students will demonstrate an ability to analyze Latin grammatical syntax and the elements of style of Latin poetry and prose.
  4. Students will study the geography, history, political climate, and aspects of private life of the ancient Roman city.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will be assigned reading in original Latin texts.
  2. Students will be shown how to use World Wide Web resources, including Perseus (www.perseus.tufts.edu) to their best advantage.
  3. Students will be called upon to read the Latin text.
  4. Students will contribute grammatical analysis of the text.
  5. Students will translate daily in class.
  6. Students will be asked questions about grammar and syntax.
  7. Difficult and unfamiliar grammar will be explained.
  8. Students will read excerpts from published translations of Caesar and Cicero in order to compare styles of translation.
  9. Students will do a short research project on a relevant topic to be presented to the class seminar.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate their fluency in Latin through frequent translation quizzes. Students will also demonstrate their knowledge of grammar, syntax, and style on tests and quizzes.
  2. Semester Exam: will be a cumulative examination of all material read to date. Students will demonstrate their fluency through written translations and their knowledge of grammar, syntax, and literary style through questions about selected words and constructions in the passages read, as well as answer questions about the relevant history and key historical figures.

Languages 312/410 - Latin 3 Honors/Latin 4

Course Title:
LAN312 Latin 3 Honors
LAN410 Latin 4

Course Description:
Latin 3 Honors/Latin 4 is intended for the student who wishes to continue his study of Latin and Roman civilization either in preparation for Advanced Placement Latin or as an end in itself. Students will examine the political and societal events in the period of transition from republic to empire. Beginning in the fall semester, students read authentic Latin prose, including selections from Eutropius, Cicero, Caesar, Augustus, Pliny, and Petronius. Selections from other authors will be read if time permits. Grade: 10-12
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Concomitant with a comprehensive review of basic Latin grammar, students will develop and demonstrate a fluency in translating Latin prose.
  2. Students will read about the political events of the first centuries BC and AD and discuss their impact on the world.
  3. Students will demonstrate an ability to read authentic Latin aloud.
  4. Students will research a particular topic related to the course material and demonstrate knowledge in writing and presentation.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will be assigned reading in original Latin texts.
  2. Students will be shown how to use internet resources to their best advantage.
  3. Students will be called upon to read the Latin text.
  4. Students will contribute grammatical analysis of the text.
  5. Students will translate daily in class.
  6. Students will be asked questions about grammar and syntax.
  7. Difficult and unfamiliar grammar will be explained.
  8. Selections in English from supplementary texts will be read to give historical context for the Latin passages in the textbook.
  9. Students will read excerpts from published translations of Latin authors in order to compare styles of translation.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate their continued acquisition of Latin vocabulary and mastery of discrete items of forms and syntax through quizzes.
  2. Students will demonstrate their fluency in Latin through graded translations.
  3. Students will demonstrate their level of fluency, including discrete knowledge and application of Latin forms, vocabulary, style and syntax on a written examination in the fall and spring semesters.

Languages 340 - Chinese 3

Course Title:
LAN340 Chinese 3

Course Description:
This course is for students who have successfully completed Chinese 2.
 

Languages 360 - German 3

Course Title:
LAN360 German 3

Course Description:
This course is designed as a continuing German course for the student who has already completed German 2 in high school. Students explore German language and culture, drawing from material that is typical of traditional third year German courses. The class is conducted mostly in German, so students quickly learn to use the language in everyday situations.
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will train themselves to speak only German in the classroom and grow to be proud of the atmosphere created in such an environment.
  2. Students will learn and implement the most effective study strategies for acquiring a second language.
  3. Students will learn periphrastic structures in terms of the categories "Desires, Obligations, and Abilities."
  4. Students will demonstrate in writing and speaking an understanding of the grammatical principles of agreement. (noun-adjective, subject-verb, article-noun)
  5. Students will learn the German-speaking countries and capitals, as well as the different states inside Germany.
  6. Students will begin to understand the use of pronouns and the declension system of nouns, adjectives, and articles.
  7. Students will learn to use the Internet to further enrich the classroom experience through use of realia to increase vocabulary.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Classes will be conducted mostly in German and students will not be allowed to speak English without express permission from the instructor.
  2. Instructors will provide the students with a list of foreign language study strategies at the beginning of the year, show them how to put them to use for maximum benefit, and periodically check that students are using them in practice.
  3. Instructors will provide appropriate setup for paired and group activities (oral questioning, demonstration, etc.).
  4. Instructors will create reading and listening comprehension activities in which students work, individually or in groups, with authentic and/or instructor-generated text to gain insight into culture, vocabulary, and linguistic structures.
  5. Instructors will use the computer, handouts, and overhead transparencies and other technologies to present students with visual prompts from which they must narrate, individually or in groups, the story line represented in the pictures.
  6. Instructors will create role-play situations in which students must creatively engage in order to accomplish some targeted task.
  7. Instructors will intentionally use the quotidian procedures of class to highlight and review appropriate vocabulary and structures in the language.
  8. Instructors will require that students use appropriate physical gestures to support their oral production of the language.
  9. Instructors will explore the efficacy of using cadences and rhythms to support the presentation and learning of key idiomatic expressions.
  10. Instructors will assign nightly homework.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate periodic progress on vocabulary acquisition and grammar through frequently announced and unannounced written and oral quizzes.
  2. Students will demonstrate understanding and communicative control of learning goals per unit through major tests for the majority of the units in the curriculum.
  3. Students will demonstrate nightly engagement with German through homework assignments that will be evaluated daily. Collective homework grade may not exceed 10 percent of unit total.
  4. Students will demonstrate understanding and control in speaking through a Final Oral Interview at the end of the spring semester.
  5. Students will demonstrate aural comprehension through a Final Listening Comprehension exam at the end of the spring semester.

Languages 412 - AP Latin

Course Title:
LAN412 AP Latin

Course Description:
For the accomplished, fluent, and highly motivated Latin student, the college-level course in Latin epic poetry focuses on selections from The Aeneid and covers approximately 1,850 lines of the text in selections from Books I, II, IV, VI, X, and XII. Metrics and poetic style are emphasized, as is preparation for the Advanced Placement Examination in Latin.
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will practice metrical analysis and demonstrate a proficiency in the scansion of the dactylic hexameter and hendecasyllabic meters.
  2. Students will engage in analysis of poetry via discussion and essays on themes, motifs, imagery, creative use of language and literary devices, the poet's agenda and goals, and the political climate of the Augustan age and its influence on the poet's work in preparation for the Advanced Placement Examination at the year's end.
  3. Students will demonstrate proficiency with the technical aspects of vocabulary and syntax as they work towards an accurate understanding of the language; great emphasis will also be placed on the epic genre in ancient literature, literary criticism as a means of understanding poetry, and on the contemporary history and culture of Rome as influences upon the selected author and his works.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will practice written exegesis of poetry and will write out translations of the passages covered; sight (i.e. unseen) passages will also be presented to the students for "on-the-spot" analysis and translation.
  2. Students will discuss in seminar setting the literature and social climate of the Augustan era in an effort to understand how outside political, personal, and social issues have affected Vergil, his works, and Latin literature in general.
  3. Students will be assigned to read daily from the texts and translate aloud in class, as well as to read the entire AENEID in English.
  4. Students will learn the poetic and literary devices common to the works of Vergil and his contemporaries.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate through tests modeled on the format of the AP exam fluency in translation, knowledge of grammar and syntax, and understanding of the literature. Test and exam questions will consist of essays, translation, and identification of context and characters.
  2. Students will demonstrate proficiency in all of the target skills and knowledge of the course by taking the College Board's Advanced Placement Examination in Latin Epic at the end of the academic year. Skills will be tested via a multiple-choice section in which sight (i.e. unseen) passages are presented to test the students skills in scanning, translating, grammatical analysis, recognizing literary devices, and identifying references to Roman culture. The test also includes a Free Response section, in which students will translate literally selections from the AP syllabus and write essays demonstrating an ability to analyze and understand the poetry once it has been translated.

Languages 422 - AP Spanish Language and Culture

Course Title:
LAN422 AP Spanish Language and Culture

Course Description:
This class is offered to the committed Spanish student who is earnestly seeking to refine his skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as to gain insight into the culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Through culturally authentic audio-visuals, students advance in listening comprehension. In classroom discussion, they increase proficiency in narrating, problem solving, and expressing and defending opinions. By reading periodicals, novels and short stories, they build vocabulary, talk and write about literary themes and learn about current events in the Hispanic World. The course covers the grammar review and basic skills required for the Spanish Language AP examination, and students are required to take the Spanish Language AP Exam in May. Grade: 10-12
 

Academic Goals:
  1. Students will learn to glean information from extended native speech by developing active listening skills and listening for global understanding.
  2. Students will practice newly learned colloquial expressions and idioms and incorporate them into classroom conversations.
  3. Students will learn how to develop a writing style on a parallel with their style in their native language; that is, they will use effective introductions, transitions, supporting arguments, and closing statements.
  4. Students will learn to self-edit written material using a standardized correction key and the AP essay rubric.
  5. Students will build vocabulary by creating their own lists drawn from reading and listening. They will learn to deduce meaning from context, rather than constantly referring to a dictionary.
  6. Students will independently complete a thorough review of Spanish grammar following a teacher generated timeline using the text, "Una vez mas".
  7. Students will learn to use a dictionary effectively.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Classes will be conducted in Spanish. Further strategies for use of circumlocution will be incorporated.
  2. Authentic audio-visuals by native speakers will be presented and students will take notes and/or complete comprehension exercises over their content.
  3. By utilizing pre-listening activities for presentation of video clips or film segments the teacher will provide opportunities for the student to understand the context of the material he will be viewing.
  4. By utilizing TPRS strategies to accompany audio-visual and text materials, the teacher will provide opportunities for the student to understand the context of the material he will be hearing and thus more fully comprehend its content.
  5. Classroom activities will include conversations in a role-play situation which are structured to require use of idiomatic expressions.
  6. Teacher will assign a variety of compositions, ranging from descriptive paragraphs, narratives, and dialogs to essays. Students will be given guidelines for effective writing in each category.
  7. Teacher will provide opportunities for peer editing and rewriting some compositions, with particular emphasis on the quality of writing required for the AP essay.
  8. Teacher wll review and/or present formation and use of all Spanish verb tenses, indicative and subjunctive, and commands, using a grammar review text.
  9. Teacher will provide training for taking the Advance Placement Language Examination, including grammar as tested in previous AP exams and opportunities for oral narration and oral response.
  10. Teacher will encourage use of new vocabulary from reading of literature by repeatedly leading in discussion of action, motiviation, characterization and setting of the book or article.
  11. Teacher will include current events from the Spanish-speaking world through use of current newspaper and magazine articles or direct TV news broadcasts.
  12. Teacher will stay abreast of opportunities for service and interaction with the local Hispanic community and encourage the students to get involved.
  13. Teacher will support the department's overseas programs and incorporate any student experience abroad into the classroom activities.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate periodic progress in vocabulary and grammar acquisition through occasional announced and unannounced quizzes.
  2. Students will demonstrate understanding of reading material by taking tests and quizzes which call for analysis as well as recall of material read.
  3. Students will regularly be evaluated on their aural comprehension of tapes and videos.
  4. Students will be evaluated on their writing skills by completing at least one persuasive essay each grading period. The AP Language rubric will be used to evaluate these essays.
  5. Students will demonstrate control of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills through a final comprehensive exam at the end of the first semester. All enrolled students are required to take the AP exam in May.

Languages 440 - Chinese 4

Course Title:
LAN440 Chinese 4

Course Description: 
This course is for students who have successfully completed Chinese 3.

Languages 460 - German 4

Course Title:
LAN460 German 4

Course Description:
This course is designed as a continuing German course for the student who has already completed German 3 in high school. Students explore German language and culture, drawing from material that is typical of traditional third year German courses. The class is conducted mostly in German, so students quickly learn to use the language in everyday situations.
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Students will train themselves to speak only German in the classroom and grow to be proud of the atmosphere created in such an environment.
  2. Students will learn and implement the most effective study strategies for acquiring a second language.
  3. Students will learn periphrastic structures in terms of the categories "Desires, Obligations, and Abilities."
  4. Students will demonstrate in writing and speaking an understanding of the grammatical principles of agreement. (noun-adjective, subject-verb, article-noun)
  5. Students will learn the German-speaking countries and capitals, as well as the different states inside Germany.
  6. Students will begin to understand the use of pronouns and the declension system of nouns, adjectives, and articles.
  7. Students will learn to use the Internet to further enrich the classroom experience through use of realia to increase vocabulary.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Classes will be conducted mostly in German and students will not be allowed to speak English without express permission from the instructor.
  2. Instructors will provide the students with a list of foreign language study strategies at the beginning of the year, show them how to put them to use for maximum benefit, and periodically check that students are using them in practice.
  3. Instructors will provide appropriate setup for paired and group activities (oral questioning, demonstration, etc.).
  4. Instructors will create reading and listening comprehension activities in which students work, individually or in groups, with authentic and/or instructor-generated text to gain insight into culture, vocabulary, and linguistic structures.
  5. Instructors will use the computer, handouts, and overhead transparencies and other technologies to present students with visual prompts from which they must narrate, individually or in groups, the story line represented in the pictures.
  6. Instructors will create role-play situations in which students must creatively engage in order to accomplish some targeted task.
  7. Instructors will intentionally use the quotidian procedures of class to highlight and review appropriate vocabulary and structures in the language.
  8. Instructors will require that students use appropriate physical gestures to support their oral production of the language.
  9. Instructors will explore the efficacy of using cadences and rhythms to support the presentation and learning of key idiomatic expressions.
  10. Instructors will assign nightly homework.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate periodic progress on vocabulary acquisition and grammar through frequently announced and unannounced written and oral quizzes.
  2. Students will demonstrate understanding and communicative control of learning goals per unit through major tests for the majority of the units in the curriculum.
  3. Students will demonstrate nightly engagement with German through homework assignments that will be evaluated daily. Collective homework grade may not exceed 10 percent of unit total.
  4. Students will demonstrate understanding and control in speaking through a Final Oral Interview at the end of the spring semester.
  5. Students will demonstrate aural comprehension through a Final Listening Comprehension exam at the end of the spring semester.

Languages 513 - Latin Literature

LAN513 Latin Literature

Course Description: 
Students may take Latin Literature as a capstone to their study of Latin or as further preparation for work at the advanced level. Students in this course will read Latin prose and lyric poetry, and will engage in stylistic analysis and historical study pertinent to the authors studied. Readings will be selected according to the interests of the instructor and students. To enroll in the course, students should have completed Advanced Placement Latin. Students who have completed all of the prerequisites for Advanced Placement Latin (Latin 3H or Latin 4) may enroll in this course with the instructor's permission.
 

Academic Goals:
  1. Students will demonstrate proficiency with the technical aspects of vocabulary and syntax as they work towards an accurate understanding of the language; great emphasis will also be placed on the lyric genre in ancient literature, literary criticism as a means of understanding poetry, and on the contemporary history and culture of Rome as influences upon the selected author and his works. 
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will be assigned to read daily from the texts and translate aloud in class.
  2. Students will practice metrical analysis and demonstrate a proficiency in the scansion of the meters used by the selected poet.
  3. Students will practice written exegesis of poetry.
  4. Students will write out translations of Latin texts, both poetry and prose, and will be asked to translate and analyze the works of some authors presented at sight.
  5. Students will discuss in seminar setting the literature and social and political climate of the Augustan era. 
  6. Students will learn the poetic and literary devices common to the selected authors.

Evaluation:

  1. Students will demonstrate through tests modeled on the format of the AP exam fluency in translation, knowledge of grammar and syntax, and understanding of the literature.  
  2. Test and exam questions will consist of essays, translation, multiple-choice work with sight passages, short-answer response sections, and identification of context and characters, as well as relevant historical information.

Languages 523 - Spanish Literature

Course Title:
LAN523 Spanish Literature

Course Description:
Continuing in the tradition of the Spanish Language AP course, Spanish Literature utilizes a more wealthy though eclectic mix of Hispanic literature, history, current events and music for the purpose of further developing students' language skills, higher order thinking, and cultural understanding. Materials include 19th and 20th century literary works (poetry, narrative, plays) from Spain and Latin America plus current events in articles and videos from various on-line resources. Folk and contemporary music injects an added dose of "salsa" to an already engaging curriculum. Grade: 12
 

Academic Goals:
  1. Students will to continue to gain greater control and deeper understanding of the language.
  2. Students will enhance their repertoire of idiomatic and periphrastic phrases.
  3. Students will demonstrate a growing written and oral proficiency with all simple and compound tenses in both the indicative and subjunctive moods.
  4. Students will gain the ability to digest and enjoy a variety of Hispanic literature in the following genres: novel, short story, and poetry.
  5. Students will develop their writing abilities in Spanish in the arena of literary criticism. They will learn to develop and support solid thesis statements in the manner outlined in Writing About Literary Texts.
  6. Students will develop a growing ability and level of comfort in identifying and discussing such literary elements as symbolism, metaphor, allegory, dramatic irony, mythic space, magical realism, etc.
  7. Students will master, in speaking and in writing, new vocabulary which will come from the assigned reading of short stories, poetry, novel and current events.
  8. Students will demonstrate the ability to maintain extended conversations over both literary topics as well as topics of general interest and those that are newsworthy and pertain to the Spanish-speaking world.
  9. Students will continue to develop an appreciation of all aspects of Hispanic culture and civilization. Likewise, they will desire to make Spanish language proficiency a lifelong pursuit.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Classes will be conducted in Spanish.
  2. The teacher will assign students a wide array of reading selections in the form of short story, novel, and poetry. The bulk of the short stories, as well as the novel, will be from the “Boom” period of 20th century Latin American Literature. Poetry, in its majority, will be peninsular Spanish from The Generation of 1898, The Generation of 1927, and the Post-Civil War period.
  3. On occasion, the students will read portions of the assigned readings aloud in class. Particularly with regard to poetry, the teacher often will be the lead model of this reading in order to foster the students’ proper attention to rhythm, meter, and tone.
  4. Periodically assigned readings will be discussed in class, in which students will be asked to identify unifying themes and point out elements of the authors’ narrative styles.
  5. The teacher will systematically review, by presentation of examples and by modeling, the conventions of written literary criticism.
Evaluation:
  1. Students will demonstrate their timely completion and comprehension of their readings by their ability to participate insightfully and effectively in daily discussion. Class size is routinely small enough (four to eight students) so that one’s degree of preparation and understanding is clearly evident.
  2. Students will demonstrate their timely completion and comprehension of their readings by way of occasional written quizzes and tests.
  3. Students will write a series of critical essays pertaining to the works that they have been assigned and have read.
  4. Any students who did not take the AP Spanish Language examination at the conclusion of Spanish AP Language will be encouraged strongly to do so at the end of the spring semester.
  5. Students will take a 3-hour exam at the end of the first semester to evaluate their cumulative skills in 1. reading comprehension (an unknown piece of literature) 2. writing (analysis of that piece of literature) 3. speaking (in-depth presentation of a selected current event in the Hispanic World) and 4. listening comprehension (AP Language Exam listening comprehension component).
  6. Students will present a multi-faceted research project (personal presentation and a written document) pertaining to either, 1. a Hispanic literary movement or 2. a particular Hispanic author.

Languages 540 - AP Chinese Language and Culture

Course Title:
LAN540 Chinese 5

Course Description: 
This course is for students who have successfully completed Chinese 4.

Meet the Faculty

Paul Cudd

Paul Cudd

Titles: German Teacher
Degrees: B.A., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Email:
Jason Jones

Jason Jones

Titles: Latin Teacher
Degrees: B.A., Vanderbilt University
Villa Vergiliana (Naples, Italy); Scuola Leonardo da Vinci (Florence, Italy); Duke University / Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies (Rome, Italy)
University of Georgia (AP Institute)
Email:
John McCall

John McCall

Class of 1961
Titles: Spanish Teacher
Degrees: B.A., University of Virginia
Email:
Luis Rodriguez

Luis Rodriguez

Titles: Spanish Teacher
Degrees: Complutense University, Madrid
B.A., M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Email:
Bryan Sansbury

Bryan Sansbury

Class of 2003
Titles: Latin Teacher
Degrees: B.A., University of South Carolina
M.A., University of Florida
Email:
David Sewell

David Sewell

Titles: Assistant Athletic Trainer, Spanish Teacher
Degrees: B.A., Bryan College
M.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Email:

Ed Snow

Titles: Chinese Teacher
Degrees: B.A., Northwestern University
M.Div., Yale University
A.M., Harvard University
Email:
Jesse Teague

Jesse Teague

Class of 2000
Titles: Spanish Teacher
Degrees: B.S., University of Georgia
Email:
Frank Watkins

Frank Watkins

Titles: Language Department Head, Spanish Teacher
Degrees: B.A., Rhodes College
Email:

Yuemei Wu

Titles: Chinese Teacher
Email: