McCallie is an All-Boys Private Boarding School and Day School, a Christian-based College Prep School. 
McCallie seeks out and accepts boys from all ethnic, racial, religious, and socioeconomic backgrounds and places a high value on a diverse student body.

English

“Before I attended McCallie, I thought that reading and writing were chores. At McCallie I discovered the joy of the written word.” -- McCallie Alum
 
How do boys learn to think clearly, write persuasively and read critically? First and foremost boys learn through thinking clearly and critically about the world around them and their experiences in it and by taking the risk to share their insights about those experiences.
 
McCallie boys read a range of engaging works of literature and non-fiction that enriches both their analytical and creative skills. They are challenged through literature and class discussions to develop ethical opinions on a myriad of subjects and to defend those opinions logically, persuasively, and thoughtfully. By learning the fundamentals of the writing process and exploring a variety of challenging writing styles and audiences, boys learn to share their thoughts confidently and clearly with the world around them.

Courses

English 110 - Responding to Literature

Course Title:
ENG110 Responding to Literature

Course Description:
Drawing from the major genres of literature--fiction, drama, and poetry--students examine the the human search for truth, justice, duty, as well as the importance of family and self-definition. In addition to intensive writing instruction and practice, the course also includes vocabulary study, basic grammar review, and oral presentations. Grade: 9
 
 
Academic Goals:
1. Students will learn a variety of writing strategies such as varying sentence length, using introductory clasuses in sentences, and varying word order in sentences for effect.
2. Students will understand how to organize and construct a good essay.
3. Students will respond to literature insightfully and imaginatively.
4. Students will learn to think independently about a text.
5. Students will not just read for comprehension but will read thoughtfully and critically as well.
6. Students will be taught the basic principles of writing a research paper. 

Instructional Methods:
1. Students will participate in Socratic Seminars based on a specific text.
2. Students will peer edit each other's essays periodically, offering suggestions for revision that writers will be expected to follow up on.
3. Students will listen to lectures to improve note-taking skills.
4. Students will evaluate each other's work as peer editors of papers.
5. Students will write multiple drafts of papers.
6. Students will revise essays after an initial evaluation by the instructor.
7. Writing Benchmark: Students will write three essays in the first semester.
8. Students will write journal questions that help them to make connections between themselves and the characters in the literature they read.
9. Students will read aloud from novels and plays.
10.  Students will be taught the basic principles of writing a research paper.  Instruction will include: evaluating and collecting research material from hard copy texts, E-books, online data bases, and the Internet; properly using research within the essay by use of direct quotations, paraphrases, and summaries; correctly using internal documentation to cite researched material; and constructing a Works Cited page.


Evaluation:
1. Students will write four or five major essays each semester to be evaluated using a rubric that establishes guidelines for both content and composition skills, including the following writing projects:
2. Students will demonstrate proper MLA style in text quotations and works cited pages.
3. Students will employ in their own writing rhetorical devices associated with narration, exposition, and argumentation.
4. Students will demonstrate their ability to not just repeat plot but also understand the themes of a work of literature.
5. Students will periodically take reading comprehension quizzes over various reading assignments.
6. The first semester will culminate in a traditional two-hour sit down final exam. This exam will be comprehensive and consist of the following: short essays, passage identification, grammar, and vocabulary. Each short essay will ask the student to make connections between two or more of the works he has read during the semester. In addition to working with the intertextuality present, the essay prompt will ask the student to make connections among the texts, the world around them, and himself. The passage identification section will focus on the student's ability to closely read and comprehend a passage from one of the works studied. The student will be presented with a small section of text (usually a paragraph, stanza, or less) and will supply the title and author of the work and a few sentences of analysis of the significance of the passage. This analysis may take one of several forms, such as focusing on the importance of the passage in developing character or plot, making some connection to a narrative structure or device that is unique or important to that work, or placing the text in an important literary or historical context. At times a superior response will use more than one approach in its analysis. The grammar and vocabulary sections will focus not only on the student's knowledge and skills, but help prepare him with the standardized tests (such as the ACT, SAT, and PSAT) he will begin to take in his freshman year. The grammar section will present the student with several sentences or a paragraph in which he will have to identify the errors and provide corrections. The vocabulary section will ask the student to determine if a word is used correctly in a sentence, complete an analogy, or select the correct word, or words, to complete a sentence. The second semester exam will be a non-traditional exam in the form of a multigenre project. It will require the student to incorporate several of the works studied throughout the year. The centerpiece of this project will be an extended essay of at least 1000 words. The project will be a suitable culminating assessment of the student's work in the course because it will demonstrate how well the student has met the following goals: the student's ability to analyze and evaluate significant literary texts; the student's ability to synthesize ideas and techniques employed in literature; the student's ability to think deeply about ideas and present the results of that thinking in an effective and sophisticated prose style; the student's ability to organize material for meaningful development of an idea in a creative way; the student's ability to attend to conventions of grammar, mechanics, and scholarly inquiry.

English 210 - World Literature

Course Title:
ENG210 World Literature

Course Description:
With its emphasis on literature from Europe, South Africa and the East, sophomore English explores literature's universal themes of family and mentors, internal and external conflicts, and initiation and self-definition. Major writing units cover a range of rhetorical patterns, such as comparison/contrast, analysis, cause and effect, argumentation and reasoning. Study of grammar and vocabulary, as well as effective elements of oral presentation, builds upon the student's knowledge from freshman year. Grade: 10


Academic Goals:

Students will learn to write essays in the personal, argumentative, and comparison/contrast modes.
  1. Students will learn to incorporate textual evidence and secondary sources into essays appropriately and gracefully, with attention to conventions of grammar, punctuation, and citation.
  2. Students will learn to use rhetorical devices such as transitions, parallel structures, and illustrations.
  3. Students will demonstrate increasing ability to interpret beyond literal meanings.
  4. Students will learn to confront moral issues and unanswered questions in literature.
  5. Students will demonstrate a tolerance for ambiguity in literature, especially concerning the theme of justice.
  6. Students will develop an appreciation for artistic ambiguity in literature.
  7. Students will enhance their cultural literacy through the poetry, prose, and drama designated in “Required Texts.”
  8. Students will learn to recognize connections between classical and modern literature.
  9. Students will learn that effective revision can be an important part of the writing process.
  10. Students will demonstrate improvement in matters of punctuation and grammar.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will be encouraged to raise essay grades through revision.
  2. Students will study the artistic ambiguities of literature, specifically in poetry.
  3. In longer fiction, students in regular classes will take frequent reading quizzes to make sure they are reading alertly.
  4. Students will read aloud in class and perform Readers’ Theatre when studying drama.
  5. Students will learn to use source material without plagiarizing.
Evaluation:
  1. Students in regular classes will take frequent reading quizzes to demonstrate that they are completing assignments.
  2. At the end of each semester, students will take an exam consisting of three essays questions, of which they will be required to answer two. The second half of the exam will require students to identify passages from works studied over the past semester and identify the significance of the quote.
  3. Writing Benchmark: Three 25-minute timed essays per semester will be evaluated according to the SAT Scoring Guide's six-point rubric.

English 212 - World Literature Honors

Course Title:
ENG212 World Literature Honors

Course Description:
With its emphasis on literature from Europe, South Africa and the East, sophomore English explores literature's universal themes of family and mentors, internal and external conflicts, and initiation and self-definition. Major writing units cover a range of rhetorical patterns, such as comparison/contrast, analysis, cause and effect, argumentation and reasoning. Study of grammar and vocabulary, as well as effective elements of oral presentation, builds upon the student's knowledge from freshman year. Grade: 10

Academic Goals:

Students will learn to write essays in the personal, argumentative, and comparison/contrast modes.
  1. Students will learn to incorporate textual evidence and secondary sources into essays appropriately and gracefully, with attention to conventions of grammar, punctuation, and citation.
  2. Students will learn to use rhetorical devices such as transitions, parallel structures, and illustrations.
  3. Students will demonstrate increasing ability to interpret beyond literal meanings.
  4. Students will learn to confront moral issues and unanswered questions in literature.
  5. Students will demonstrate a tolerance for ambiguity in literature, especially concerning the theme of justice.
  6. Students will develop an appreciation for artistic ambiguity in literature.
  7. Students will enhance their cultural literacy through the poetry, prose, and drama designated in “Required Texts.”
  8. Students will learn to recognize connections between classical and modern literature.
  9. Students will learn that effective revision can be an important part of the writing process.
  10. Students will demonstrate improvement in matters of punctuation and grammar.
Instructional Methods:
  1. Students will be encouraged to raise essay grades through revision.
  2. Students will study the artistic ambiguities of literature, specifically in poetry.
  3. In longer fiction, students in regular classes will take frequent reading quizzes to make sure they are reading alertly.
  4. Students will read aloud in class and perform Readers’ Theatre when studying drama.
  5. Students will learn to use source material without plagiarizing.
Evaluation:
  1. Students in regular classes will take frequent reading quizzes to demonstrate that they are completing assignments.
  2. At the end of each semester, students will take an exam consisting of three essays questions, of which they will be required to answer two. The second half of the exam will require students to identify passages from works studied over the past semester and identify the significance of the quote.
  3. Writing Benchmark: Three 25-minute timed essays per semester will be evaluated according to the SAT Scoring Guide's six-point rubric.

English 310 - American Literature

Course Title:
ENG310 American Literature

Course Description:
In both American Literature and U.S. History, juniors encounter many of the ideas that shaped our country’s vision and development: freedom, individuality, nonconformity, and the American Dream, to name but a few. Study of traditional American texts and more contemporary works reinforces genre study, but the course’s primary focus is to help students understand the ideas that shape their culture. Student presentations and use of the Internet enhance students’ research skills while frequent writing assignments and instruction insure that students learn to expand their stylistic palette and become more adept writers. Grade: 11
 
Academic Goals:
1.       Students will become familiar with the content, themes, and social contexts of a range of American Literature in fiction, poetry, non-fiction prose, and drama.
2.       Students will understand techniques employed by writers to impart their ideas, such as narrative stanza patterns, development of scene, characters' subtext, irony, understatement.
3.       Students will become aware of the variety of strategies available to writers in narration, exposition, comparison/contrast, and argumentation, including literary analysis.
4.       Students will learn to recognize in professional models, in their own original prose, and in the essays of their peers the techniques of effective essay writing, such as
a.       selecting a focused thesis for an essay;
b.       employing precise diction, sophisticated syntax, a range of strategies for organizing paragraphs, arresting titles, provocative conclusions, evocative imagery, transition strategies;
c.        principles of organization that build upon but are not restricted to the five-paragraph theme model.
5.       Students will recognize the features of literary style characteristic of each genre and of representative American authors.
6.       Students will respond to literature insightfully and imaginatively.
7.       Students will recognize that genuine depth of thought is the result of sustained commitment to intellectual inquiry.
8.       Students will appreciate the artistic achievements of the most successful American authors
9.       Students will respect the challenges associated with reflective, thoughtful reading of literature.
10.   Students will grow impatient with mediocrity and superficiality in one's writing and thinking.
11.   Students will embrace a willingness to examine rigorously one's own facility with writing strategies.
12.   Students will appreciate the value of constructive criticism, both offered and received.
13.   Students will be eager to explore a range of ideas and values presented in American literature.
 
Instructional Methods:
1.       In class discussion, students will take responsibility for identifying significant issues in close textual analysis, for asking probing questions, for talking with each other as well as with the teacher, and for clarifying how the reading material demonstrates important thematic issues in American literature and effective writing technique.
2.       Students will teach a class.
3.       Speaking & Listening Benchmark: Students will master Socratic seminar skills.
4.       Research & Writing Benchmark: Students will practice literary research--locating information in print and electronic media, organizing information, and using information to argue a thesis or make a presentation.
5.       Research Benchmark: Students will compile an annotated bibliography.
6.       Students will peer edit each other's essays periodically, offering suggestions for revision that writers will be expected to follow up on.
7.       Students will demonstrate in their own writing the techniques of effective composition enumerated above in our Academic Goals.
8.       Students will revise essays after an initial evaluation.
9.       Students will participate in listserve dialogue through e-mail.
10.   Speaking & Listening Benchmark: Students will make a presentation on a poem or on the work of an American poet.
11.   Speaking & Listening Benchmark: Students will make oral presentations based on individual or group work.
 
Evaluation:
1.       Writing Benchmark: Three times each semester, students will write 25-minute in-class essays on topics growing out of course material and class discussion to be evaluated with the SAT essay rubric.
2.       Students will write four or five major essays each semester to be evaluated using a rubric that establishes guidelines for both content and composition skills, including some of the following writing projects:
a.       essay on an idea from summer reading
b.       imitative writing to demonstrate facility with prose style strategies
c.        reflective essays/journal entries in response to the reading
d.       essays on how poetic technique contributes to a poem’s purpose
e.       literary analysis
f.        personal narrative
g.       expository essays
h.       argumentative essays
i.         comparison/contrast essays
j.         original short story (optional)
3.       Students will write timed hour-long essays either in class or for homework to demonstrate application of content to a new literary problem.
4.       Students will demonstrate in their writing their facility with conventions of manuscript form, punctuation and grammar (especially the Top Twenty errors from EasyWriter), and form for using quotes from the literature.
5.       Students will employ in their own writing rhetorical devices associated with narration, exposition, comparison/contrast and argumentation.
6.       Students' poetry presentations will be assessed for skill in oral interpretation, coverage of applicable content from the Modern American Poets text, and skill in leading a class discussion.
7.       Fall exam: Students will write a comprehensive essay on a new poem, demonstrating what they have learned about decoding the language of poetry and responding to its meaning. Additionally, students will respond to at least two other essay topics writing essays that have specific, unified, and persuasive thesis statements, that demonstrate detailed development of their ideas of the thesis, that show appropriate organization, that offer an original and significant response to the topic, and that exhibit meaningful insight to the question as a whole.
8.       Spring exam: In the spring, students will demonstrate their ability to assume greater responsibility in a long-term independent project of literary analysis. They will be asked to present and defend an idea that is important to American literature and that runs through many of the selections covered in the course and in their parallel reading. This will represent the students' facility with course content and with principles of writing.
9.       At intervals, students will self-assess their progress in the course with e-mail messages to the instructor or other means.

English 312 - AP English Literature and Composition

Course Title:
ENG312 AP English Literature and Composition

Course Description:
In American Literature (AP) juniors encounter many of the ideas that shaped our country’s vision and development: freedom, individuality, nonconformity, and the American Dream, to name but a few. Practice in a close reading of traditional and contemporary fiction, non-fiction, drama and poetry leads students to examine the uniquely American expression of the English language. At the course's end, students will have learned to expand their stylistic palettes and become more adept writers and more astute critical readers. All students will sit for the Advanced Placement Literature and Composition exam in the Spring. Grade: 11
 
Academic Goals:
1. Students will become familiar with the content, themes, and social contexts of a range of American literature in fiction, poetry, non-fiction prose, and drama.
2. Students will understand techniques employed by writers to impart their ideas, such as narrative viewpoint, characterization, setting, figurative language, prose style, structure, versification, stanza patterns, development of scene, characters’ subtext, irony, understatement.
3. Students will become aware of the variety of strategies available to writers in narration, exposition, comparison/contrast, and argumentation, including literary analysis.
4. Students will learn to recognize in professional models, in their own original prose, and in the essays of their peers the techniques of effective essay writing, such as
a. selecting a focused thesis for an essay;
b. employing precise diction, sophisticated syntax, a range of strategies for organizing paragraphs, arresting titles, provocative conclusions, evocative imagery, transition strategies;
c. principles of organization that build upon but are not restricted to the five-paragraph theme model.
5. Students will recognize the features of literary style characteristic of each genre and of representative American authors.
6. Students will respond to literature insightfully and imaginatively.
7. Students will appreciate the artistic achievements of the most successful American authors.
8. Students will respect the challenges associated with reflective, thoughtful reading of literature.
9. Students will embrace a willingness to examine rigorously one's own facility with writing strategies.
10. Students will appreciate the value of constructive criticism, both offered and received.
11. Students will be eager to explore a range of ideas and values presented in American literature.
Instructional Methods:
1. Students will teach a class.
2. Research & Writing Benchmark: Students will practice literary research--locating information in print and electronic media, organizing information, and using information to argue a thesis or to make a presentation.
3. Students will peer edit each other’s essays periodically, offering suggestions for revision that writers will be expected to follow up on.
4. Students will demonstrate in their own writing the techniques of effective composition enumerated above in our Academic Goals.
5. Students will revise essays after an initial evaluation.
6. Speaking & Listening Benchmark: Students will make a presentation on a poem or on the work of an American poet.
7. Research Benchmark: Students will compile an annotated bibliography.
8. Writing Benchmark: Students will write a "My Turn" personal essay based on the Newsweek Magazine model.
9. Speaking & Listening Benchmark: Students will make oral presentations based on individual or group work.
Evaluation:
1. Writing Benchmark: Students will periodically write 25-minute in-class essays on topics growing out of course material and class discussion to be evaluated with the SAT writing rubric.
2. Students will write three or four major essays each semester to be evaluated using a rubric that establishes guidelines for both content and composition skills, including the following writing projects:
a. imitative writing to demonstrate facility with prose style strategies
b. reflective essays/journal entries in response to the reading
c. essays on how poetic technique contributes to a poem’s purpose
d. literary analysis
e. personal narrative
f. expository essays
g. argumentative essays
h. comparison/contrast essays
i. original short story (optional)
3. Students will demonstrate in their writing their facility with conventions of manuscript form, punctuation and grammar for using quotes from the literature.
4. Students will employ in their own writing rhetorical devices associated with narration, exposition, comparison/contrast and argumentation.
5. Students' poetry presentations will be assessed for skill in oral interpretation, coverage of applicable content from the Modern American Poets text, and skill in leading a class discussion.
6. Fall exam: Students will take an AP Literature and Composition styled exam comprised of 50 multiple choice questions and three short essays which will partly demonstrate ability to apply knowledge of course content and writing style to new isues. The exam will include an assessment of student's facility with composition skills.
7. Students will frequently write 50 minute timed writings as practice AP essays throughout both semesters.
8. Spring Exam: The AP Literature and Composition in May.

English 412 - Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama

Course Title:
ENG412 Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama

Course Description:
This course will explore the work of Shakespeare and other dramatists of the Renaissance period in England. Although William Shakespeare is the dominant figure during this time--and for good reason--authors such as Christopher Marlowe, John Webster, Ben Jonson, Thomas Kyd, Cyril Tourner and others were producing compelling and insightful dramas. These authors and their plays were popular, successful, and offer insight into what Professor E.M.W. Tillyard refers to as “The Elizabethan World Picture”.  We will read examples of the major types of drama being written and enacted such as Tragedy, Comedy, and History. We will also consider the differing themes that are represented in these works. Hopefully we will emerge for this course with a better appreciation and understanding of the art, historical context, and value of these works.  We will make substantial use of video and film productions of these plays as they were, after all, intended to be viewed.  Semester course. Grade: 12

English 413 - Contemporary Literature

Course Title:
ENG413 Contemporary Literature

Course Description:
Today’s writers and today’s issues—that’s what students encounter in Contemporary Literature.  The writers represented take readers on wild rides through both familiar and unfamiliar territory—from a variety of cultures and landscapes, not just American.  Students will be invited to reflect on these journeys in their own writing with creative and personal responses to the people, places, and predicaments found in the readings.  Readers are likely to encounter mature topics and language that reflect today’s straightforward sensibilities. Semester Course. Grade: 12

 
Academic Goals:
1.  Students will learn to evaluate literature through both a personal and a technical lens.
2.  Students will become familiar with the styles and concerns of contemporary literature.
3.  Students will gain confidence in your own perceptions and in your ability to enjoy reading literature on your own.
4.  Students will be able to identify and evaluate innovative developments in the contemporary literary scene.
5.  Students will develop strategies for becoming more critical and careful readers of each other’s writing.
 
Instructional Methods:
1.  Students will participate in Socratic Seminars based on a specific text.
2.  Students will demonstrate in their own writing the techniques encountered in contemporary literature.
3.  Students will write personal journals in response to challenges encountered in the literature..
4.  In class discussion, students will learn how to identify significant issues in close textual analysis, to ask probing questions, and to clarify how the reading material demonstrates important thematic issues.
 
Evaluation:
1.  Students will significantly contribute to their own evaluations, assessing participation, writing, and engagement.
2. The study of each work will conclude with a final seminar centered around several major holistic questions.
3. The final project will be an essay on an original topic growing out of the student’s holistic experience with the literature.
 

English 419 - The Autobiographical Self

Course Title:
ENG419 The Autobiographical Self

Course Description:
While we take it for granted that we all have selves, it may well be that the notion of self-hood as we understand it derives largely from autobiographical writing. From memoir we understand ourselves in relation to our childhood and family as well as to the larger communities of school, city, ethnicity, and even nationality. In this course, students will read from a variety of non-fiction narratives whose authors seek to define themselves as complex social, political, and theological creatures. In their own writing, both autobiographical and critical, students will examine the relationship of individual identity and the first person essay. Semester Course. Grade: 12

Academic Goals:
 
Students will:
  1. Understand how a writer manipulates language to create desired tone through such stylistic devices as diction, syntax, figurative language, point of view and irony
  2. Discover the structural, rhetorical, and semantic resources of the language by an organized study of the structures of sentences, paragraphs, and larger discursive patterns
  3. Become effective, energetic writers through study of models and practice with their own prose
  4. Commit to a vigorous nightly reading schedule
Instructional Methods:
 
Students will:
  1. Write weekly letters to the teacher as a means of constant feedback as well as the discovery of their own voice
  2. Participate in conversations on the strategies writers use in the work at hand, taking responsibility for leading discussions in close textual analysis, for asking probing questions, and for talking with each other more than with the teacher
  3. Work in small group settings, producing a single response to a literary or analytical problem
  4. Peer edit one another's work, offering feedback about stylistic issues as well as matters of logic, content and coherence
  5. Revise major essays
Evaluation:
  1. The college essay--communicating the self beyond the numbers
  2. Essay on a place--home, the South, groups, essay on a person of importance
  3. Essay on a personal obsession or idosyncrasy
  4. Essay on a formative person
  5. Students will write shorter essays of prose analysis, evaluating how a writer uses the tools of language to impact an audience
  6. Students will take occasional reading quizzes to assess their understanding of the content as well as to reward nightly diligence

English 423 - Literature for Life

Course Title:
ENG423 Literature for Life

Course Description: 
For many of our students, Freshman English in college may be the last English class that they will ever take.  We hope that they will leave McCallie with a lifelong interest in reading and with writing skills that are adaptable and up-to-date.  This course aims to take one last shot at meeting those benchmarks.  Through our studies of novels and short stories, students will study texts with an emphasis on learning how to pursue self-study and future paths of inquiry.  This course will teach students how reading and literature can play a role in their adult lives.  Additionally, the writing assignments will have real-life applications and audiences, encouraging the students to take a final, serious look at their writing strengths and weaknesses.  Semester course.  Grade: 12
 
 
Academic Goals:
  1. Refresh research techniques.
  2. Use Photo Story 3 to make a presentation.
  3. Techniques of the argumentative essay.
  4. Techniques of the review.
  5. How to polish letter to the editor and review for publication.
  6. Different reading strategies for different kinds of texts.
  7. Grammar problems that drive employers crazy.
Evaluation:
  1. A researched magazine article for submission to McCallie Magazine.
  2. An editorial/letter to the editor for submission to Chattanooga Times-Free Press or The Chattanoogan.com.
  3. A grant proposal or visual presentation.
  4. A book or film or drama review (possible publication on amazon.com).
  5. A statement of personal philosophy or a chapel talk (may be replaced by college essay in first semester classes). 

English 424 - Literature of the Irish Experience

Course Title:
ENG424 Literature of the Irish Experience

Course Description:
This course will focus on major Irish works, authors, and themes from the mid-nineteenth century Irish literary renaissance, to the euphemistically titled "Troubles" of the recent past, to the present day.  Poetry, plays, short stories, novels, and non-fiction writings from authors such as William Butler Yeats, Lady Gregory, Frank O'Connor, Sean O'Casey, Bernadette Devlin, Bobby Sands, and others will be used to help us explore the struggle for the construction of an Irish identity that is separate from the British and ultimately leads to the achievement of an independent (although divided) post-colonial Ireland.  We will pay careful attention to the intersection of literature, culture, politics, history, and war to see how they form an interconnected web that also encompasses issues of race, gender, language, and religion.  In addition to the readings, we will make use of film and music to enhance our understanding of the development of a distinctively Irish literature in the 20th century and beyond. Grade: 12
 
Academic Goals:
1.  Students will learn and practice the techniques of close reading of primary and secondary text.
2.  Students will develop their analytical writing skills and ability to incorporate the ideas and criticism of others into their own writings, both as a starting point and as support for their reasoning about the primary text.
3.  Students will read a variety of challenging works whose ideas, structures, and styles will provide intellectual challenges.
4.  Students will listen actively, debate and discuss constructively, and speak articulately and persuasively as they use their writings on the controversial questions we raise as the springboards for discussion.
5.  Students will confront and analyze moral and ethical dilemmas as they examine the choices made by the characters in the novels we will read.
6.  Students will place the works we will study in the appropriate historical context to see how time and place influence the author's works.
7.  Students will examine narrative choices made by the author and their impact on how the text is read and understood.
8.  Students will strengthen their ability to make connections between works and ideas.
9.  Students will apply their learned research skills to find source material to prepare an essay and bibliography.
10.  Students will explore and come to an understanding of the unique historical and political context of the literature they have read.

Instructional Methods:
1.  Students will lead and participate in Socratic Seminars based on a specific text, whether primary or secondary.  The students will also give an oral presentation to the class to present the results of their individual research project.
2.  In class discussion, students will take responsibility for identifying significant issues in close textual analysis, for asking probing questions, talking with each other as well as with the teacher, and clarifying how the reading material demonstrates important thematic issues appropriate to the specific text under consideration.
3.  Students will also make extensive use of the text, learning strategies for effective underlining, note taking, and cross-referencing in their books.
4.  Students will work in small groups on focused questions about the reading.
5.  A significant research assignment will be the culminating evaluation for this course.  This research assignment will call upon the research skills they have previously learned and honed throughout the semester.

Evaluation:
1.  Students will write focused in-class (and occasional take-home) essays on various aspects and questions related to the course readings.
2.  Students may take occasional reading quizzes to keep them accountable and to reward careful reading.
3.  Students will write several formal essays that will be graded according to a specific rubric designed for each assignment.
4.  The final exam will be a research project that requires the student to compose an annotated bibliography and 5-8 page historical overview of a person, event or topic in the field of Irish studies, chosen from a provided list of approved topics.  The student will also be required to give an oral presentation to the class of their research findings.

English 426 - Fiction Writing

Course Title:
ENG426 Fiction Writing

Course Description:
Everyone loves a good story.  So how about learning to write one?  Along with reading great short stories that represent an exciting variety of subjects and forms, students will practice the techniques of fiction writing by writing their own original stories and presenting them to the class in workshop format.  Writing stories teaches students how to read the fiction of others from the inside out, with a writer's eye, and so the students will help each other revise their best stories for the final project.  Semester Course. Grade: 12
 
Academic Goals:
1.  Students will be able to recognize and evaluate points of view.
2.  Students will be able to identify issues relevant to characterization.
3.  Students will be able to recognize the functions of secondary characters.
4.  Students will be able to identify the specific purposes of and methods for developing scenes.
5.  Students will appreciate the value of constructive criticism, both offered and received.
6.  Students will learn to read fiction with a focus on the author's intended theme and on the ideas the author intends to convey.
7.  Students will be able to identify a protagonist, his or her decisions that lead to the conclusion, and the epiphany that accompanies that conclusion.
8.  Students will be able to identify how metaphor and symbol enhance theme, conflict and characterization.
9.  Students will learn to recognize the importance of dialogue in fiction and how it functions to move the story forward.
10.  Students will compare and contrast the different ways in which stories are structured (linear and modular) and learn to identify the strengths of more original organizational principles for addressing an author's subject matter.

Instructional Methods:
1.  Students participate in seminars based on assigned readings, mostly contemporary stories that demonstrate a range of techniques and subjects.
2.  After practicing fictional technique with brief writing exercises, students will write two original short stories.
3.  Students will respond to each others' stories in workshop format and submit to each writer a critique and editing suggestions.
4.  In class discussion, students will take responsibility for identifying significant issues in close textual analysis, for asking probing questions, for talking with each other as well as with the teacher, and for clarifying how the reading material demonstrates important thematic isssues in how men and women relate.

Evaluation:
1.  Four two-page scenes and two stories will be presented and evaluated in workshop.
2.  As a final exam project, students will revise one of their short stories and write an essay about what they learned through the workshop and revision process.
3.  A "Techniques of Fiction" journal and class discussion will reinforce close reading of the texts.

English 433 - Gothic Literature

Course Title:
ENG433 Gothic Literature

Course Description: 
This course will focus on the development of the horror genre and its representation in novels, short fiction, poetry, and film.  Considerable time will be spent exploring the nature of fear, and why we find books and films of this type to be pleasurable.  Starting with the very first example of this genre (Walpole’s gothic Castle of Otranto) we will track the elements of and changes to this specific type of fiction from the mid 1700’s up to the twentieth century and Stephen King’s The Shining; paying particular attention to historic periods and how science, society, and culture have impacted, influenced, and made these works possible.  Semester Course. Grade: 12

English 434 - First Novels

Course Title:
ENG434 First Novels

Course Description: 
This senior elective will focus on first novels and firsts in a series of books.  There is something special about writers' first books.  Sometimes they are masterpieces, sometimes they contain every good idea a writer ever had, and sometimes they are underdeveloped or flawed.  Similarly, the first book in a series in a series introduces key characters and creates a new “universe” that the writer will continue to popular and more fully realize in later books.  But will the later installments get better?  We’ll see. The course will give students a chance to discover great writers in their nascent phases. Students will also meet engaging characters whose stories continue in other books, sparking the opportunity for further reading. In addition to reading, students will write some “firsts” of their own.  Semester Course. Grade: 12

English 435 - The Art of the Play on Stage and Screen

Course Title:
ENG435 The Art of the Play on Stage and Screen

Course Description: 
Writing compelling stories for the stage is an art quite different than writing for the movie screen.  In this course, we'll consider how words influence action to explore the process for writing each kind of play. With extensive oral delivery, character challenges, storyboarding, and close analysis of scripts, students will come to see how some of the best plays have been constructed. They will end the course writing and possibly performing their own, original, well-crafted stories worthy of the theatre and the silver screen.  Semester Course. Grade: 12

Meet the Faculty

Kemmer Anderson

Kemmer Anderson

Titles: Adjunct English Teacher
Degrees: A.B., Davidson College
M.A., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
M.A., St. John's College
Email:
David Cook

David Cook

Titles: English Teacher
Email:
Sam Currin

Sam Currin

Class of 2003
Titles: English Department Head, English Teacher
Degrees: B.A., University of the South
M.A., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Email:
Ken Henry

Ken Henry

Titles: English Teacher
Degrees: B.A., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Email:
Cleve Latham

Cleve Latham

Titles: English Teacher
Degrees: B.A., M.S., Ed.D., Vanderbilt University
Email:
Chet LeSourd

Chet LeSourd

Class of 1972
Titles: English Teacher, Caldwell Chair of English Composition, Burns Dorm Head
Degrees: B.A., Taylor University
M.A., Middlebury College
Email:
Steve Reno

Steve Reno

Titles: English Teacher
Email:
Eamon Thornton

Eamon Thornton

Class of 2002
Titles: English Teacher, Hutcheson Dorm Head
Degrees: B.A., Hampden-Sydney College
Email:

Erin Tocknell

Titles: English Teacher
Degrees: B.A., Carnegie Mellon University
M.F.A., West Virginia University
Email:
Adam Tolar

Adam Tolar

Class of 1996
Titles: English Teacher
Degrees: B.S., Indiana University
M.A., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Email:
Trey Tucker

Trey Tucker

Class of 1998
Titles: Associate Director of Counseling, English Teacher
Degrees: B.S., University of Florida
M.B.A., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
M.A., Liberty University
Email: