McCallie is an All-Boys Private Boarding School and Day School, a Christian-based College Prep School. 
McCallie seeks out and accepts boys from all ethnic, racial, religious, and socioeconomic backgrounds and places a high value on a diverse student body.

Foreign Languages

To begin a new language is to step into a new world. To speak a new language and study it is to explore the cultures of those who speak the language. To master a language is to walk among its people and its countries and understand, communicate and appreciate.

Languages encourage those who study them to taste and touch and hear and see and feel.

The Foreign Language Department at McCallie supports the active learning needs of boys through a program that stresses active participation and communication. Boys at McCallie participate in a language by speaking, listening, reading, and writing, using materials that are authentic to the culture of the language. Through a process of language immersion in the classroom, boys learn to communicate effectively in the target language.

Courses

Languages 710 - Latin 1A

Course Description: 
This course is the first half of a two-year sequence of a course in Latin vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. The primary goals of Latin 1A are to provide the student with a solid foundation in the ancient language, an introduction to Roman culture, and an awareness of English vocabulary that is derived from Latin. The stories in the text follow the daily lives of a family living in the city of Rome who also own a villa near Pompeii. (Two semesters, 7th Grade).
 

Academic Goals:

  1. The course content will include the following grammatical topics (Chapters 1 - 17):
    1. Declensions: first, second, and third.
    2. Noun cases: nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, ablative, and vocative.
    3. Conjugations: first, second, third, and fourth.
    4. Verb tenses: present, imperfect, and perfect.
    5. Adjectives: positive, comparative, and superlative.
    6. Irregular verbs: sum, possum, volo, nolo, fero, eo.
    7. Personal pronouns/personal endings.
    8. Subject-verb agreement.
    9. Questions: interrogatives, rhetorical, and enclitic -ne.
    10. Number: singular/plural.
    11. Person: first, second, and third.
    12. Word order.
    13. transitive/intransitive/linking verb
    14. gender: masculine, feminine, neuter
    15. noun/adjective agreement
    16. complementary infinitive
    17. imperative
  2. The course content will include the following cultural topics:
    1. The city of Pompeii.
    2. The Roman family.
    3. Houses in Pompeii.
    4. Daily life.
    5. Professions.
    6. Dress
    7. Slaves and freedman and the slave market.
    8. The Roman Villa.
    9. Head of the family.
    10. Schools and education.
    11. Roman Travel.
    12. The destruction and excavation of Pompeii.
  3. The course content will include the following mythology studies:
    1. Aeneas and the Trojan War.
    2. The Founding of Rome.
    3. The Kings of Rome.
    4. The major gods and goddesses.
    5. Other great Olympians.

Instructional Methods:

  1. Since the course is designed on the principles of inductive teaching, all exercises and activities lead students to derive general principles of grammar and groups of vocabulary in context and to consolidate and organize their knowledge as they become comfortable with the material. Each stage of the text includes model sentences, several readings, drills, and cultural readings in English on the particular topic presented in the readings.
  2. Students will model their notebooks after an organized and clearly labeled example.
  3. Students will actively form new rules and apply them immediately as well as reevaluate the logic of their thinking.
  4. Students will listen to readings of selected stories to reinforce pronunciation and comprehension.
  5. Students will read Latin aloud with appropriate gestures, facial expressions, and tone.
  6. Students will present research on various cultural topics.
  7. Students will complete Latin comprehension questions in Latin about the readings either in written form or orally.
  8. Students will complete exercises/drills in the text and reproducible handouts to reinforce vocabulary, grammatical points, and paradigms.
  9. Students will learn derivatives through exercises that show vocabulary in context.
  10. Students will complete comprehension questions about the cultural readings for each stage.
  11. Students will learn note-taking skills based on these readings.
  12. Students will view and discuss selected historical videos pertaining to cultural topics.
  13. Students will have opportunities for project work (individual, pairs, or groups) such as creating movie posters of "myths" and casting all parts with modern actors/actresses, building three-dimensional models of Roman buildings or architectural structures, writing tour guides for the city of Pompeii, writing and delivering a speech of a candidate for local government, etc.
  14. Research Benchmarks: Students will do research on various cultural topics.
  15. Speaking and Listening Benchmarks: Students will present their research findings to the class. Students will read Latin aloud and do listening exercises.

Evaluation:

  1. Although an examination commonly is considered a tool to measure knowledge learned, in foreign language an examination will also be a learning experience in itself. After completing evaluations, students should not only experience a sense of accomplishment, but should also possess more knowledge about the subject than before they began the test. Students will be required to demonstrate not only their mastery of the material covered but also that they understand the processes and can apply them to new situations.
  2. Students will also learn to review for and take tests effectively--an essential skill for any language program. Students will practice identifying what they do know in order to organize their time more efficiently in practicing that which they don't know. Students will have opportunities to practice good habits of reviewing important points contained in shaded boxes, practicing old exercises, reviewing past errors, rereading stories, reviewing vocabulary and derivatives, and guessing possible test formats.
  3. Students will complete frequent quizzes on vocabulary in context (i.e., not just what the verb means, but translated in its specific form--person, number, tense, voice, mood).
  4. Students will receive a daily grade for effort on homework completion and/or grading on the work produced.
  5. Students will complete final examinations at the end of each semester based on the cumulative material. The format for exams will follow the format of tests given throughout the semester. There will be a sight passage to translate with content and grammar questions. There will be multiple choice, matching and T/F over culture, history, derivatives, and grammar. There will also be paradigms to fill in and work on conjugations and declensions. Each exam is usually worth 250 total points.
  6. Students will participate nearly daily when reviewing homework.
  7. Students will be evaluated on writing using the same guidelines established for the seventh grade and/or any other clearly defined points.
  8. Students will do self-assessments of their progress from time to time.

Languages 720 - Spanish 1A

Course Description: 
This beginner course, conducted almost entirely in Spanish, is the first half of the two-year Spanish experience in the Middle School. The overall goal is for a student to build a foundation by developing the basic skills of speaking, listening, writing, and reading in Spanish. This is an interactive course with an emphasis on listening, speaking, and student participation. The student-centered atmosphere of this class is created mainly through the interactive retelling of stories using target Spanish expressions and unique strategies for the mastery of relevant vocabulary. Personal responsibility is also emphasized as students develop and maintain effective study skills and organizational skills. (Two semesters, 7th Grade)

Academic Goals:

  1. The student will be able to use Spanish to do the following:
    1. Greet people and introduce himself.
    2. Ask how someone is feeling and tell how he is.
    3. Ask where someone is from and tell where he is from.
    4. Say goodbye.
    5. Use the Spanish alphabet to spell.
    6. Use numbers to count and tell telephone number, the date, and his age.
    7. Recognize and respond to basic classroom requests.
    8. Find out what other people are like.
    9. Tell what he likes and does not like to do.
    10. Compare his likes and dislikes with other people's.
    11. Describe his class schedule.
    12. Find out about someone else's class schedule.
    13. Talk about his leisure time activities.
    14. Make plans with friends.
    15. Extend, accept, and turn down invitations to activities.
    16. Ask if someone is hungry or thirsty and express the same for himself.
    17. Tell what he likes and does not like to eat and drink.
    18. Give reasons for his food and drink preferences.
    19. Describe the taste and smell of certain foods.
    20. Describe family members and friends.
    21. Ask and tell what another person's age is.
    22. Tell what other people like and do not like to do.
    23. Ask about and buy clothes.
    24. Describe the color, fit, and price of clothes.
    25. Tell where and when he bought clothes and how much he paid.

Instructional Methods:

  1. Teacher-centered demonstrations or skits (with the aid of visual cues) that introduce the new vocabulary in context.
  2. Fictional stories created in class to provide repetitive use of target vocabulary.
  3. Short response questions by the teacher.
  4. Oral, paired "information gap" activities for student practice.
  5. Whole-class information searches for student's question/answer practice.
  6. Study of on-line flash cards or vocabulary lists.
  7. One-on-one instruction (back work).
  8. Homework assignments for student practice of material.

Evaluation:

  1. Chapter tests.
  2. Periodic vocabulary quizzes.
  3. Class participation.
  4. Vocabulary list checks.
  5. Graded homework.
  6. Graded group skits.
  7. Individual oral tests.
  8. Extra credit opportunities.
  9. The final exam is a three part experience which includes a traditional written component, a comprehensive aural test, and an exit interview in Spanish that allows the student to demonstrate the skills he has acquired during Spanish 1A.
  10. Periodic on-line quizzes

Languages 740 - Chinese 1A

Course Description: 
Mandarin Chinese is a foreign language spoken by nearly 25% of the earth's population and is the major mode of communication within the world's next great superpower. Language is inherent in culture and being as such, knowledge and respect for both Chinese culture and tradition are essential to students building successful rapport with the Chinese. Emphasis on speaking and listening skills will be a priority in the beginning to ensure students have a solid linguistic foundation before Chinese characters are introduced into the curriculum. At the end of the second year of middle school Chinese, students will be able to engage in basic communicative activities in a culturally appropriate manner, and will have memorized between 100 and 200 of the most commonly used Chinese characters.  (Two semesters, 7th Grade)

Academic Goals:

  1. Students will develop the skills necessary to learn Mandarin Chinese both in a formal setting as well as individually.
  2. Students will gain a broad understanding of, and deep appreciation for Chinese culture, tradition, and history.
  3. Students will become orally proficient in a wide variety of basic communicative activities ranging from simple greetings to giving directions.
  4. Students will memorize between 100 and 200 of the most commonly written Chinese characters.

Languages 810 - Latin 1B

Course Description: 
Latin 1B is the second half of a two-year sequence of a course in Latin vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. The primary goals of Latin 1B are to provide the student with a solid foundation in the ancient language, an introduction to Roman culture, and an awareness of English vocabulary that is derived from Latin. The stories in the text center around two different locations in the Roman Empire: the Bay of Naples and the city of Rome. (Two semesters, 8th Grade)

Academic Goals:

  1. The course content will include the following grammatical topics (Chapters 18 - 27):
    1. Conjugations: all.
    2. Declensions: Second neuter and third neuter, fourth, fifth.
    3. Noun cases: all.
    4. Verb tenses: Pluperfect, future, future perfect. Synopses.
    5. Adjectives: First/second declension and third declension.
    6. Irregular verbs: future, pluperfect, future perfect tenses.
    7. Pronouns: demonstratives, hic and ille, relative, personal, possessive, reflexive.
    8. Adjective/noun agreement.
    9. Relative pronoun/antecedent agreement.
    10. Dative with intransitive compound verbs.
    11. Enclitic: que.
    12. Interrogative particles: nonne and num.
    13. Principle parts of verbs.
    14. Adjectives as substantives.
    15. Partitive genitive.
    16. Word order.
    17. 3rd declension adjectives of one termination.
    18. Subordinating clauses using conjunctions: enim, igitur, postquam, quamquam, quod, simulac, tamen, and ubi.
    19. Infinitive uses.
    20. Imperative mood.
    21. distinguishing dative and ablative
    22. ablative uses
  2. The course content will include the following cultural topics:
    1. Legendary Heroes of Ancient Rome.
    2. Graffiti from Ancient Inns.
    3. Roman Travel II.
    4. Roman Hospitality.
    5. The Early Republic.
    6. Frontier Life: Rome, Northern Europe, North Africa.
    7. Aqueducts.
    8. Frontier Life: Cultural Assimilation.
    9. Memorial Inscriptions and Beliefs On Life After Death.
    10. The City of Rome.
    11. Engineering and architecture.
    12. Rome Becomes a World Leader
    13. Charioteers

Instructional Methods:

  1. Since the course is designed on the principles of inductive teaching, all exercises and activities lead students to derive general principles of grammar and groupings of vocabulary in context and to consolidate and organize their knowledge as they become comfortable with the material. Each stage of the text includes model sentences, several readings, drills, and cultural readings in English on the particular topic presented in the readings.
  2. Students will try a variety of techniques for vocabulary memorization in order to develop their strengths and work on their weaknesses.
  3. Students will model their notebooks after an organized and clearly labeled example.
  4. Students will actively form new rules and apply them immediately as well as reevaluate the logic of their thinking.
  5. Students will work singularly, in pairs or in groups on readings and peer evaluate each other’s translations.
  6. Students will listen to readings of selected stories to reinforce pronunciation and comprehension.
  7. Students will read Latin aloud with appropriate gestures, facial expressions, and tone.
  8. Students will complete Latin comprehension questions in Latin about the readings either in written form or orally.
  9. Students will complete exercises/drills in the text and reproducible handouts to reinforce vocabulary, grammatical points, and paradigms.
  10. Students will learn derivatives through exercises that show vocabulary in context.
  11. Students will complete comprehension questions about the cultural readings for each stage.
  12. Students will learn note-taking skills based on these readings.
  13. Students will view and discuss selected historical videos pertaining to cultural topics.
  14. Students will have opportunities for project work (individual, pairs, or groups) which includes research and writing about various cultural topics, a research project on famous Romans, a tour guide to ancient Rome, etc.
  15. Writing Benchmark: Students will write three paragraph descriptions on various cultural topics. Students will write 3-4 page research paper on famous Romans. Students will write evaluations of Roman web sites. Students will translate stories grammatically and linguistically correct
  16. Research Benchmarks: Students will do research on various cultural topics and famous Romans, as well as evaluate different web sites.
  17. Speaking and Listening Benchmarks: Students will read Latin passages aloud. Students will present research material orally.

Evaluation:

  1. Although an examination commonly is considered a tool to measure knowledge learned, in foreign language an examination will also be a learning experience in itself. After completing evaluations, students should not only experience a sense of accomplishment, but should also possess more knowledge about the subject than before they began the test. Students will be required to demonstrate not only their mastery of the material covered, but also that they understand the processes and can apply them to new situations.
  2. Students will also learn to review for and take tests effectively--an essential skill for any language program. Students will practice identifying what they do know in order to organize their time more efficiently in practicing that which they don’t know. Students will have opportunities to practice good habits of reviewing important points contained in shaded boxes, practicing old exercises, reviewing past errors, rereading stories, reviewing vocabulary and derivatives, and guessing possible test formats.
  3. Students will complete frequent quizzes on vocabulary in context (i.e., not just what the verb means, but translated in its specific form--person, number, tense, voice, mood).
  4. Students will receive a daily grade for effort on homework completion and/or grading on the work produced.
  5. Students will take written quizzes on vocabulary or paradigms for each stage and tests at the completion of each stage. These tests will present sight-readings with questions as well as multiple choice questions, true or false, and matching on grammar points, vocabulary, derivatives, and the specific cultural topic for the stage. Most questions are in Latin unless English is otherwise appropriate.
  6. Students will complete final examinations at the end of each semester based on the cumulative material. The format of the exam will be the same as tests given throughout the semester. There will be a sight passage to translate with content and grammar questions. There will be multiple choice, matching, fill in the blank and T/F questions on cultural topics, history, derivatives and grammar. The exams also have a section of paradigms for completion as well as coonjugation and declension work.
  7. Students will participate nearly daily when reviewing homework.
  8. Students will be evaluated on writing using the same guidelines established for the seventh grade and/or any other clearly defined points.
  9. Students will do self-assessments of their progress from time to time.

Languages 820 - Spanish 1B

Course Description: 
Spanish 1B is the second half of the two-year Spanish experience in the Middle School and is conducted almost entirely in Spanish. The overall goal is for a student to continue building his foundation by improving and expanding his skills of speaking, listening, writing, and reading in Spanish. This is an interactive course with an emphasis on listening comprehension, speaking skills, and student participation. The student-centered atmosphere of this class is created through the interactive retelling of stories using target Spanish expressions, and unique strategies for the mastery of relevant vocabulary. Personal responsibility is also emphasized as students develop and maintain effective study skills and organizational skills. (Two semesters, 8th Grade)

Academic Goals:

  1. The student will be able to use Spanish to do the following:
    1. Talk about the weather.
    2. Discuss vacation choices and vacation activities.
    3. Discuss what to take on a trip.
    4. Tell where he lives.
    5. Describe his home and what he does in each room of the home.
    6. Name household chores.
    7. Describe in detail how he feels and where he hurts.
    8. Ask how someone else is feeling and find out what hurts.
    9. Suggest what he and others can do to feel better and maintain good health.
    10. Name various places in the community.
    11. Name things he does in the community.
    12. Identify different means of transportation.
    13. Talk about television programs and movies.
    14. Tell when events begin and end and how long they last.
    15. Express and defend his opinion about programs and movies.
    16. Ask politely to have something brought to him.
    17. Order a meal.
    18. Say what he ate and drank.

Instructional Methods:

  1. Teacher-centered demonstrations or skits (with the aid of visual cues) that introduce the new vocabulary in context.
  2. Short response questions by the teacher.
  3. Oral, paired information gap activities for student practice.
  4. Whole-class information searches for student’s question/answer practice.
  5. In small student groups, the creation of short skits using target vocabulary.
  6. Study of on-line flash cards or vocabulary lists.
  7. One-on-one instruction (back work).
  8. Homework assignments for student practice of material.
  9. Fictional stories to provide repetitive use of targeted vocabulary.

Evaluation:

  1. Chapter tests.
  2. Periodic vocabulary quizzes.
  3. Class participation.
  4. Vocabulary list checks.
  5. Graded homework.
  6. Research project about issues facing Spanish speaking people in the U.S. and Latin America.
  7. Graded oral presentations.
  8. Individual oral tests.
  9. Extra credit opportunities.
  10. The final exam is a three part experience: a traditional written component, a comprehensive aural test, and an exit interview in Spanish that allows the student to demonstrate the skills he has acquired during Spanish 1A and Spanish 1B
  11. Periodic on-line quizzes.

Languages 840 - Chinese 1B

Course Description: 

Mandarin Chinese is a foreign language spoken by nearly 25% of the earth's population and is the major mode of communication within the world's next great superpower. Language is inherent in culture and being as such, knowledge and respect for both Chinese culture and tradition are essential to students building successful rapport with the Chinese. Emphasis on speaking and listening skills will be a priority in the beginning to ensure students have a solid linguistic foundation before Chinese characters are introduced into the curriculum. At the end of the second year of middle school Chinese, students will be able to engage in basic communicative activities in a culturally appropriate manner, and will have memorized between 100 and 200 of the most commonly used Chinese characters.  (Two Semesters, 8th Grade)

Languages 850 - Language Skills

Course Description: 
This course is designed to develop second language (SL) learning skills for students who have demonstrated difficulties in a first middle school second language course. (Two semesters, 8th Grade)
 

Academic Goals:

 
The learner will:

1. Develop vocabulary study skills.

2. Utilize and become proficient with Quia (an online educational website).

3. Be able to accurately conjugate verbs from basic forms.

4. Be an active listener and will participate in class.

5. Understand the language choices that will be offered in upper school classes.

6. Be capable in basic Spanish speaking skills.

7. Speak articulately and persuasively.

8. Make thoughtful use of technology.

9. Manage time productively and efficiently.

10. Respond appropriately to a variety of assessment instruments.

11. Cultivate academic self-reliance and intellectual risk-taking.

12. Value both collaborative and independent learning.

13. Commit to learning through challenging work.

14. Acknowledge and accept constructive criticism.

Instructional Methods:

1. Oral questioning.

2. Paired activities.

3. Note taking.

4. Teacher-guided activities.

5. Study of the text, working of activities in both textbook and online.

6. One-on-one instruction (backwork).

7. Use of the language in class.

8. Authentic literature in the language.

Evaluation:

1. Weekly vocabulary quizzes.

2. Unit tests every four/five weeks.

3. Class participation.

4. Online interview recordings.

5. Reading fluency.

6. Pronunciation.

7. Semester tests.

Meet the Faculty

Kay Belyea

Kay Belyea

Titles: Middle School Latin Teacher, MS 101 Teacher
Email:

Maria Gonzalez

Titles: Middle School Spanish Teacher
Email:
Veronica Herrera

Veronica Herrera

Titles: Middle School Spanish Teacher, MS101 Teacher
Degrees: M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
B.A., University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Email:

Ed Snow

Titles: Chinese Teacher
Degrees: B.A., Northwestern University
M.Div., Yale University
A.M., Harvard University
Email: